Treatment Breaks May Delay or Prevent Vemurafenib Resistance

Giving melanoma patients a break from vemurafenib could make this treatment more effective. Research in Nature shows that vemurafenib-resistant tumors keep growing during treatment because they produce high levels of mutated BRAF proteins, which are involved in cell division. Moreover, these tumors actually depend on the drug to grow. In contrast, an on-and-off treatment schedule can help keep melanomas from becoming resistant to vemurafenib in mice.

Primary source: http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nature11814.html


Testing Lymph Nodes Near Melanomas May Not Help

A British Medical Journal report questions an invasive, expensive standard practice for melanoma patients in the U.S. Called sentinel node biopsy, the approach involves testing lymph nodes near tumors for cancer cells and removing nodes that test positive. The report cites a 2006 study showing that sentinel node biopsy did not increase 5-year survival rates and calls for further analysis of the practice’s effectiveness. Sentinel node biopsies are not standard in the UK.


Melanoma Apps No Substitute for Doctors

A JAMA Dermatology study shows the dangers of using smartphone apps to self-diagnose melanomas. The researchers compared diagnoses of 60 melanomas and 128 benign lesions by a board-certified dermatopathologist to those of four apps. Three of the apps incorrectly said that 30% or more of the melanomas were harmless. The fourth app, which sent images to board-certified dermatologists, was better, but still misdiagnosed one of the melanomas as benign. These apps are not subject to regulatory oversight.

Primary source: http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1557488#qundefined