Huge Progress in Palliative Care

A Q&A with Diane E. Meier, MD, FACP, Director, Center to Advance Palliative Care; Professor of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai; New York, NY; diane.meier@mssm.edu

Originally published November 8, 2017

Q: You wrote in MedGenMed in 2007 that palliative care was the job of all hospitals. In October 2017 you were honored at the National Academy of Medicine for your achievements in this field. How fully has your charge to hospitals in 2007 been realized?

A: Palliative care is a fairly new medical specialty devoted to reducing suffering and improving quality of life for people living with serious illness-whether the disease is curable, chronic, or life threatening and progressive. Palliative care teams work alongside disease treatment specialists to provide an added layer of support in service of pain and symptom management, family support, attention to the social determinants of health, and skilled communication about what to expect and what matters most to the patient in the context of the reality of the illness. Multiple studies demonstrate palliative care’s contribution to achievement of the triple aim: better experience of care, better care outcomes (including survival in several studies), and as an epiphenomenon of better care, much lower unnecessary utilization of 911 calls, ED visits, and hospitalization. Continue reading…


Important New Research on Early Palliative Care for Advanced Cancer Patients Published

“Researchers at Trinity College Dublin and Mount Sinai in New York have just published new research which for the first time provides strong evidence on the economic benefits of early palliative care intervention for people with an advanced cancer diagnosis. Their findings were published today in the highly esteemed international peer reviewed Journal of Clinical Oncology.

“Previous research has shown the clinical benefits of early palliative care, but this new study robustly demonstrated how early access to expert palliative care decision making resulted in very significant cost reductions of up to 24%. The intervention reduced both the length and intensity of hospital stay for patients with advanced cancer.

“The researchers from Trinity’s Centre for Health Policy and Management and Mount Sinai’s Icahn School of Medicine, led by Peter May, HRB Economics of Cancer Fellow at Trinity, studied over 1000 patients’ pathways of care in five major US hospitals and looked at costs associated with their care based on whether they saw a specialist palliative care consultation team or received standard hospital care.”