Adding Pemetrexed to Gefitinib Improves PFS in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of pemetrexed and gefitinib offered improved progression-free survival (PFS) over gefitinib alone in East Asian patients with advanced nonsquamous non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and activating EGFR mutations, according to a new randomized, open-label study.

“EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) including gefitinib have been shown to improve outcomes in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC. ‘Given their different mechanisms of action, combination treatment with EGFR-TKIs and chemotherapy may further improve outcomes,’ wrote study authors led by James Chih-Hsin Yang, MD, PhD, of National Taiwan University Hospital in Taipei. Previous trials of such combinations have not shown clinical benefit, however, though this could have been because of antagonism between the agents used or because wild-type EGFR patients were included.”

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Motesanib Fails in a Phase III Trial for NSCLC

The gist: New research results have dashed hopes that a drug called motesanib (AMG 706) might be an effective treatment for Asian people with stage IV, non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In 2011, the drug failed testing in patients, but data showed there might be some benefit for certain Asian patients. Testing continued in a group of patients from Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. However, the new results show that motesanib does not improve standard treatment with the drugs paclitaxel and carboplatin.


Ros1 Gene Fusions Found in 2.4% of Asian Patients with Lung Adenocarcinoma, Associated with Young Age at Diagnosis

The gist: Oncologists can sometimes look for certain genetic mutations in a patient’s tumor to help determine the best treatment options for that patient. Researchers have recently found that a particular mutation called ROS1 fusion is present in a subgroup of patients consisting of young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma. People with ROS1 mutations in their lung tumors might benefit from treatment with a drug called crizotinib. The drug has not yet been approved for widespread use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), but patients can enroll in clinical trials to gain access to it.

“ROS1 fusion genes were successfully detected independent of gender or smoking history in young East Asian patients with lung adenocarcinoma, a histological subgroup in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), using multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) diagnostic tests.

“In NSCLC treatment algorithms, a personalized therapy approach is now being taken based on the genetic characteristics of the cancer. Patients with specific oncogenic molecular aberrations, for example EGFR mutations and ALK gene fusions, respond well to drugs that target these molecular abnormalities. ROS1 is another potential oncogenic molecular driver and this target is sensitive to crizotinib, a drug approved for the treatment of ALK gene fusion NSCLC .

“Researchers from the National Taiwan University Hospital examined 160 surgical specimens from early-stage and 332 specimens of fluid around the lungs (malignant pleural effusions) from late-stage lung adenocarcinoma patients. They initially examined these specimens for EGFR and KRAS mutations as well as ALK gene. Specimens that were negative for these three oncogenic drivers were then examined for ROS1 fusions using RT-PCR and IHC. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was used if there was a discrepancy between RT-PCR and IHC.”