ELCC 2016 Press Release: Osimertinib Given as First-line Treatment May Alter Biology of EGFR-Mutated Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The third generation epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) osimertinib is effective in the first-line treatment of EGFR mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a late-breaking abstract presented at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland. A second late-breaking abstract confirms the drug’s effectiveness in patients with the T790M mutation.

“EGFR inhibition is the standard of care for NSCLC patients with EGFR activating mutations but nearly 50 to 60% develop resistance by developing a T790M mutation. Osimertinib is a potent inhibitor of the original EGFR mutations (exon 19 and exon 21) and the T790M. The study presented today investigated whether the use of osimertinib as first-line therapy for EGFR mutation positive NSCLC would result in favourable efficacy due to delayed T790M mediated resistance.

“The study included 60 patients from two phase I expansion cohorts of the AURA trial that had locally advanced or metastatic EGFR mutated NSCLC. Thirty patients received 80 mg a day and 30 received 160 mg a day in the first-line setting. The median follow-up was 16.6 months.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


CHMP Recommends Afatinib for Second-Line NSCLC

“Afatinib (Giotrif, EU; Gilotrif, US) has received a positive recommendation from the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) as a treatment for patients with advanced squamous cell non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) following progression on platinum-based chemotherapy, according to Boehringer Ingelheim, the manufacturer of the irreversible EGFR inhibitor.

“The CHMP opinion, which recommends that the treatment should gain approval from the European Medicines Agency in this setting, is based on data from the phase III LUX-Lung 8 trial. In the study, second-line afatinib reduced the risk of both disease progression and death by 19%, compared with erlotinib (Tarceva) in patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the lung.”


Clovis Oncology Announces Rociletinib New Drug Application Scheduled for Presentation at Upcoming FDA Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee Meeting

“Clovis Oncology, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLVS) announced today that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has scheduled the New Drug Application (NDA) for rociletinib for discussion by the Oncologic Drugs Advisory Committee (ODAC) on April 12, 2016. Rociletinib is an investigational therapy for the treatment of patients with mutant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have been previously treated with an EGFR-targeted therapy and have the EGFR T790M mutation.

“The ODAC reviews and evaluates data concerning the safety and effectiveness of marketed and investigational human drug products for use in the treatment of cancer and makes recommendations to the FDA.

“ ‘We are actively preparing for this advisory committee meeting and look forward to the discussion about rociletinib,’ said Patrick J. Mahaffy, President and CEO of Clovis Oncology. ‘New treatments are needed for this hard-to-treat patient population, and we believe that rociletinib represents an important new option for patients with mutant EGFR T790M-positive lung cancer.’ “


Afatinib Shows Clinical Benefit for Lung Cancer Patients with Brain Metastases

“Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with common epidermal growth factor (EGFR) mutations and brain metastases showed improved progression-free survival (PFS) and response from the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) afatinib compared to standard platinum doublet chemotherapy.

“More than 25% of with advanced NSCLC experience progression to the brain from their primary lung and this number increases to 44-63% for those NSCLC tumors driven by EGFR mutations. Prognosis is poor and typically ranges for 1-5 months for those with . EGFR TKIs are highly effective therapies for advanced NSCLC driven by EGFR mutations, especially the common mutations, exon 19 deletions and L858R point mutations. Even though there are a number of EGFR TKIs approved for first-line therapy of EGFR mutation positive NSCLC, there is a scarcity of prospective data for EGFR TKIs in patients with brain metastases.”


Support for First-Line Erlotinib in NSCLC with EGFR Mutations

“For patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with activating epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations, erlotinib is active, and treatment beyond progression is feasible and may delay salvage therapy in selected patients, according to a study published online Dec. 30 in JAMA Oncology.

“Keunchil Park, M.D., from the Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine in Seoul, South Korea, and colleagues examined the efficacy of first-line erlotinib therapy in  with NSCLC with activating EGFR mutations in the Asian Pacific trial of Tarceva as first-line in EGFR mutation (ASPIRATION). Patients received 150 mg/day erlotinib until ; after this point, therapy could be continued at the discretion of the patient and/or investigator. Patients were followed for a median of 11.3 months.”


Afatinib a Better Choice for EGFR-Mutated Lung Cancer in First-Line Treatment

“Patients with EGFR-activating mutations in advanced lung cancer seem to benefit more from afatinib than gefitinib as first-line treatment, researchers report at the first ESMO Asia 2015 Congress in Singapore.

“In the global, randomised, open-label Phase IIb LUX-Lung 7 (LL7) trial, the irreversible ErbB family blocker afatinib significantly improved efficacy versus gefitinib across a range of clinically relevant endpoints, such as progression-free survival, time-to- failure and objective response rate. ‘Based on these results I would consider afatinib as the EGFR (TKI) of choice for the first-line treatment for patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell (NSCLC),’ lead author, Professor Keunchil Park, head of the Division of Hematology/Oncology at Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea, said.”


Lung Cancer Patients Gain Access to New Treatment for Fourth Time in Two Months

“The International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC) is pleased to hear of another approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that helps in the fight against lung cancer—the fourth in two months. The FDA approved necitumumab (Portrazza) in combination with standard chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received systemic therapy for their advanced disease.

“Necitumumab binds to the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a protein commonly found on squamous NSCLC tumors, and blocks EGFR from binding its ligands, thus preventing tumor growth. Necitumumab is the first monoclonal antibody type of EGFR inhibitor to be approved in lung cancer, whereas there are a number of tyrosine kinase type of EGFR inhibitors (TKI) already FDA approved and used in clinical practice. These TKIs include gefitinib, erlotinib, afatinib, and osimertinib.”


AZD9291 Shows Clinical Activity in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients with Leptomeningeal Disease

“The epidermal growth factor receptor-tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) AZD9291 crossed the blood-brain barrier and showed clinical activity in heavily pretreated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with leptomeningeal disease, a disease in which lung cancer cells spread to the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord, according to data from a phase I BLOOM clinical trial presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Nov. 5–9.

” ‘Leptomeningeal disease at initial diagnosis of NSCLC is rare; however, as their lung cancer progresses, up to 15 percent of patients will develop this devastating complication. Additionally, an increased risk of central nervous system [CNS] involvement has been reported among patients with EGFR-mutant NSCLC, in particular those treated with a first-generation EGFR-TKI,’ said Dae Ho Lee, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Oncology in the University of Ulsan College of Medicine and Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea.”


Adding Tivantinib to Standard Erlotinib Treatment Improved Outcomes for Specific Subgroup of Patients with Lung Cancer

“Adding the investigational anticancer therapeutic tivantinib to standard erlotinib treatment substantially increased progression-free survival for patients with advanced nonsquamous non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had tumors positive for epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations, according to a subset analysis of data from the phase III MARQUEE clinical trial presented at the AACR-NCI-EORTC International Conference on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics, held Nov. 5–9.

” ‘EGFR inhibitors like erlotinib are effective treatments for patients with advanced NSCLC with and without EGFR mutations,’ said Wallace Akerley, MD, director of thoracic oncology at the Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. ‘However, tumors invariably develop resistance. MET overexpression is associated with resistance to EGFR therapy, and the phase III MARQUEE clinical trial set out to investigate whether adding the MET inhibitor tivantinib to erlotinib treatment could improve patient outcomes.’ “