Osimertinib Improves Progression-Free Survival in Patients With EGFR Mutated Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Osimertinib improves progression-free survival by 54% compared to standard first line therapy in patients with EGFR mutated non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to late-breaking results from the FLAURA trial presented today at the ESMO 2017 Congress in Madrid.

“EGFR  are present in around 15% of NSCLC in Western populations, rising to 35% in Asian populations. EGFR inhibitors are superior to chemotherapy in the first line treatment of these patients. However, despite high response rates and good progression-free survival, patients invariably develop  to drugs such as erlotinib and gefitinib. In the majority of patients this resistance is mediated by a T790M mutation.”

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Results of New Drug, ASP8273, Show Response in Patients with Treatment-Resistant NSCLC

The gist: People with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has both the EGFR and T790M mutations might benefit from a new drug. The drug is called ASP8273. A clinical trial tested ASP8273 in volunteer patients in Japan. In the trial, it shrank people’s tumors. More research is needed, but it is hoped that the drug might be a good alternative for people whose tumors are resistant to drugs like erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib.

“In a second presentation looking at new ways of treating non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has both the EGFR and T790M mutations, researchers will tell the 26th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Barcelona, Spain, that an oral drug called ASP8273 has caused tumour shrinkage in patients in a phase I clinical trial in Japan.

“Mutations of the epidermal growth factor (EGFR) occur in about 30-35% of Asian patients with NSCLC (and in 10-15% of Caucasian patients). EGFR inhibitors called tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), such as erlotinib, gefitinib and afatinib, can be used to treat EGFR-mutated NSCLC. However, these patients will eventually develop resistance to EGFR TKI therapy, rendering their disease resistant to current treatments. A further mutation called T790M accounts for 60% of this acquired resistance.

“ASP8273 is a new drug that inhibits the EGFR mutation and the T790M resistance mutation. Earlier research in mice had shown that it caused NSCLC to disappear completely, and so a I clinical trial was started in January 2014 to assess the drug’s safety and efficacy in humans.

“Twenty-four Japanese patients have enrolled so far to receive one of six levels of doses (25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 600mg) once a day. A further seven patients have been enrolled into a second group to evaluate doses of 100mg, 200mg and 400mg a day (a dose escalation study), and the researchers are planning to enrol a total of 124 patients. Cancer had progressed in all the patients after prior treatment with EGFR TKI therapy, and most of them had the T790M mutation.”


On the Failure of Lung Cancer Drug Onartuzumab in a Phase III Clinical Trial


Most new cancer drugs fail clinical testing. Because they don’t make it to the pharmacy, we usually hear very little about them. But widespread media coverage made it hard to ignore the recent termination of a trial testing the drug onartuzumab. Details of the story raise concerns about the patient enrollment processes of some clinical trials. Continue reading…