FDA Approves Portrazza to Treat Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Portrazza (necitumumab) in combination with two forms of chemotherapy to treat patients with advanced (metastatic) squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have not previously received medication specifically for treating their advanced lung cancer.

“Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States, with an estimated 221,200 new diagnoses and 158,040 deaths in 2015. The most common type of lung cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, is further divided into two main types named for the kinds of cells found in the cancer – squamous cell and non-squamous cell (which includes adenocarcinoma).”

Novartis Gets FDA Approval for Skin Cancer Drug Combination

“Nov 20 Novartis AG said on Friday it received the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s regular approval for a drug combination to treat an aggressive form of skin cancer.

“The FDA approved Tafinlar and Mekinist for treatment of metastatic melanoma based on two years overall survival in patients, the company said.

“The combination was initially approved based on mid-stage data through the FDA’s accelerated approval program, but the approval was contingent on data from late-stage trial.”

Vemurafenib/Cobimetinib Combo for Melanoma Approved by FDA

“The FDA has approved a combination of vemurafenib (Zelboraf) and cobimetinib (Cotellic) to treat patients with metastatic or unresectable BRAF V600E/K mutation-positive melanoma. The approval was based on based on an extension in progression-free survival (PFS) in the phase III coBRIM study.

“In the data submitted to the FDA, the median PFS with the combination was 12.3 versus 7.2 months with vemurafenib plus placebo (HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.46-0.72). PFS was the primary endpoint of the study with secondary outcome measures including overall survival (OS), objective response rate (ORR), duration of response, and safety.”

Bristol-Myers Squibb Receives Approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Yervoy (ipilimumab) as Adjuvant Treatment for Fully Resected Stage III Melanoma

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company BMY, -0.27% today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Yervoy (ipilimumab) 10 mg/kg for the adjuvant treatment of patients with cutaneous melanoma with pathologic involvement of regional lymph nodes of more than 1 mm who have undergone complete resection including total lymphadenectomy. This approval is based on clinical data from a pivotal Phase 3 trial, CA184-029 (EORTC 18071), which demonstrated Yervoy 10 mg/kg significantly improved recurrence-free survival (RFS) vs. placebo in this setting, with a 25 percent reduction in the risk of recurrence or death. The median RFS was 26 months (95% ci:19)(95% ci:39) for Yervoy vs. 17 months (95% ci:13)(95% ci:22) for placebo (hazard ratio [HR]=0.75; 95% CI: 0.64, 0.90; p<0.002). Yervoy is the first and only FDA-approved immune checkpoint inhibitor in the adjuvant treatment for fully resected Stage III melanoma (lymph node >1 mm).”

Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Opdivo (nivolumab) Receives Expanded FDA Approval in Previously-Treated Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC), Offering Improved Survival to More Patients

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Opdivo (nivolumab) injection, for intravenous use, for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with progression on or after platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with EGFR mutation or ALK translocation should have disease progression on appropriate targeted therapy prior to receiving Opdivo. In a Phase 3 trial, CheckMate -057, Opdivodemonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in previously treated metastatic non-squamous NSCLC compared to chemotherapy, with a 27% reduction in the risk of death (hazard ratio: 0.73 [95% CI: 0.60, 0.89; p=0.0015]), based on a prespecified interim analysis. The median OS was 12.2 months in the Opdivo arm (95% CI: 9.7, 15.0) and 9.4 months in the docetaxel arm (95% CI: 8.0, 10.7). This approval expands Opdivo’s indication for previously treated metastatic squamous NSCLC to include the non-squamous patient population. Squamous and non-squamous NSCLC together represent approximately 85% to 90% of lung cancer cases.”

FDA Approves Pembrolizumab for PD-L1-Positive Lung Cancer

“The FDA granted an accelerated approval to pembrolizumab (Keytruda) as a treatment for patients with pretreated advanced non­–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) across all histologies whose tumors express PD-L1. The PD-1 inhibitor was approved along with a companion diagnostic, the PD-L1 IHC 22C3 pharmDx test, and is indicated for patients who progressed on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy or EGFR-or ALK-targeted agents in patients harboring those mutations.

“The approval was based on data from the phase I KEYNOTE-001 trial, in which the overall response rate (ORR) with the drug was 41% among a subgroup of 61 patients with pretreated PD-L1­–positive advanced NSCLC as determined by the 22C3 pharmDx diagnostic test. Response duration ranged from 2.1 to 9.1 months. A survival improvement has yet to be demonstrated in a clinical trial, and the accelerated approval is contingent upon the eventual outcomes of confirmatory studies.”

Nivolumab/Ipilimumab Combination FDA Approved for BRAF Wild-Type Melanoma

“The combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab has received accelerated FDA approval as a treatment for patients with BRAF V600 wild-type (WT) unresectable or metastatic melanoma, based on findings from the phase II CheckMate-069 study.

” ‘Historically, metastatic melanoma has been a difficult disease to treat. Now, a new treatment option based on the combination of two valued immuno-oncology agents demonstrates significant efficacy versus ipilimumab in metastatic melanoma,’ said Jedd D. Wolchok, MD, PhD, chief, Melanoma and Immunotherapeutics Service, Department of Medicine and Ludwig Center at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in a statement. ‘Today’s approval represents a step forward for the melanoma community, providing hope for patients with metastatic melanoma.’ ”

FDA Grants Breakthrough Therapy Designation to Azedra for Pheochromocytoma, Paraganglioma

“The FDA granted breakthrough therapy designation to Ultratrace iobenguane I-131 for the treatment of patients with iobenguane-avid metastatic or recurrent pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma, according to a press release from the drug’s manufacturer.

“Ultratrace iobenguane I-131 (Azedra, Progenics Pharma), a late-state radiotherapeutic drug candidate, is being evaluated in a phase 2b trial of patients with malignant pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma. Pheochromocytomas — rare tumors usually found within one or both adrenal glands — are referred to as paragangliomas when they arise in other areas of sympathetic nerve cells.

“Ultratrace iobenguane I-131 — a very high specific activity form of iobenguane I-131 — is produced using Progenics’ Ultratrace platform, a technology designed to prevent unlabeled iobenguane from being carried through the manufacturing process to the final formulation, according to information listed on Progenics’ website. Ultratrace iobenguane I-131 is designed for use as an imaging agent in order to determine a therapeutic dose that is safe for normal organs, as well as for therapy.”

FDA Approves Iressa for EGFR Metastatic Lung Cancer

“Iressa (gefitinib) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a specific genetic mutation (epidermal growth factor receptor [EGFR]). A just-approved companion diagnostic test can identify patients who could benefit from this new use.

“Iressa is a kinase inhibitor, a class of drugs designed to block proteins that spur development of cancer cells. The therascreen EGFR RGQ PCR Kit is a newly approved diagnostic that can help doctors detect patients with the genetic mutation who are candidates for treatment with Iressa.

“Iressa was evaluated for this use in clinical trials involving 106 people with previously untreated EGFR mutation-positive metastatic NSCLC. Tumors shrank in about 50 percent of people treated with Iressa 250 mg once daily. This effect lasted an average of six months, the FDA said. Severe side effects of Iressa may include interstitial lung disease, liver damage, gastrointestinal perforation, severe diarrhea, and ocular disorders. More common side effects are diarrhea and skin reactions.”