An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

“A trip to almost any bookstore or a cruise around the Internet might leave the impression that avoiding cancer is mostly a matter of watching what you eat. One source after another promotes the protective powers of ‘superfoods,’ rich in antioxidants and other phytochemicals, or advises readers to emulate the diets of Chinese peasants or Paleolithic cave dwellers.

“But there is a yawning divide between this nutritional folklore and science. During the last two decades the connection between the foods we eat and the cellular anarchy called cancer has been unraveling string by string.”


An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

“A trip to almost any bookstore or a cruise around the Internet might leave the impression that avoiding cancer is mostly a matter of watching what you eat. One source after another promotes the protective powers of ‘superfoods,’ rich in antioxidants and other phytochemicals, or advises readers to emulate the diets of Chinese peasants or Paleolithic cave dwellers.

“But there is a yawning divide between this nutritional folklore and science. During the last two decades the connection between the foods we eat and the cellular anarchy called cancer has been unraveling string by string.”


An Apple a Day, and Other Myths

“A trip to almost any bookstore or a cruise around the Internet might leave the impression that avoiding cancer is mostly a matter of watching what you eat. One source after another promotes the protective powers of ‘superfoods,’ rich in antioxidants and other phytochemicals, or advises readers to emulate the diets of Chinese peasants or Paleolithic cave dwellers.

“But there is a yawning divide between this nutritional folklore and science. During the last two decades the connection between the foods we eat and the cellular anarchy called cancer has been unraveling string by string.”


Denosumab Outshines Zoledronic Acid in Advanced Prostate Cancer

A phase III study evaluated two osteoporosis drugs, denosumab and zoledronic acid, for the treatment of skeletal problems in patients with bone metastases in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The average time to first bone-related adverse event was 20.7 months with denosumab and 17.1 months with zoledronic acid, suggesting that denosumab was more effective in this group.

Primary source: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(10)62344-6/fulltext


Two Trials Provide New Answers for Treatment of Advanced Prostate Cancer

New findings from two prostate cancer trials will be presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology Annual Meeting. One trial determined that men with advanced prostate cancer who receive intermittent hormone therapy survive an average of 5.1 years compared to 5.8 years for men who receive therapy continuously. The second trial determined that abiraterone (Zytiga) in combination with prednisone (a steroid) was effective for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) in patients who have not yet received chemotherapy. Abiraterone is currently approved for patients who have not responded to chemotherapy.


Prostatic Enlargement Drug May Improve Prostate Cancer Screening Results

A recent study evaluated the effects of finasteride (sold as Proscar) on the usefulness of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening to detect prostate cancer. Researchers determined that treatment with finasteride may differentiate individuals who have a rise in PSA due to cancer from those who have a rise due to other causes, such as benign enlargement and inflammation. The combination of finasteride with PSA to detect prostate cancer may decrease the rate of unnecessary biopsies.


Patients' Race Linked to Prostate Surgery Quality

Recent data suggests that black men with prostate cancer may have worse outcomes than white men. Several factors appear to be involved, including access to appropriate health care and economic issues.


Breast Cancer Drug May Decrease Side Effects of Hormone Therapy for Prostate Cancer

A recent study found that the breast cancer drug Tamoxifen can prevent breast tenderness and breast pain in men treated with androgen suppression therapy for prostate cancer. Tamoxifen was more effective at reducing breast symptoms than another breast cancer medication or radiation therapy. Treatment was not associated with any significant side effects.

Primary source: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/96


New Drug Improves Survival in Advanced Prostate Cancer

In a recent phase III clinical trial, the anti-androgen drug abiraterone (sold as Zytiga) improved survival from 11.2 months to 15.8 months in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Participants were treated with abiraterone in combination with prednisone, a common steroid medication. The most common side effects were fatigue, anemia, and back and bone pain.

Primary source: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045(12)70379-0/fulltext