FDA Accepts Resubmission of Lutathera NDA for GEP-NETs

Excerpt:

“The FDA has accepted a resubmitted new drug application (NDA) for Lutathera (lutetium [177Lu] oxodotreotide) for the treatment of patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). Under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act, the FDA is scheduled to make a final approval decision on or before January 26, 2018.

“The NDA is based on the phase III NETTER-1 trial, which compared Lutathera with high-dose octreotide LAR for patients with grade 1 or 2 metastatic midgut NETs. In this trial, there was a 79% reduction in the risk of progression or death with Lutathera compared with octreotide.”

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Strosberg Discusses Latest Lutathera Data in Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“In December 2016, the FDA informed Advanced Accelerator Applications that its new drug application for Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate) as a treatment for patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) would need to be resubmitted.

“The application was based on the phase III NETTER-1 trial, which randomized patients with advanced, progressive, somatostatin receptor-positive midgut NETS to receive either Lutathera (116 patients) plus best supportive care, including octreotide long-acting repeatable (LAR), or octreotide LAR alone (113 patients).”

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FDA Issues Complete Response Letter for Lutathera in Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“The FDA has issued a complete response letter (CRL) to Advanced Accelerator Applications informing the company that its new drug application for Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate) as a treatment for patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) would need to be resubmitted.

“The CRL, which follows a discipline review letter (DRL) issued in November, requests new subgroup data, a safety update, and that revisions be made to the previously submitted data. The letter did not request the initiation of additional studies of Lutathera.”

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Advanced Accelerator Applications Reports 15.4% Sales Growth in the Third Quarter of 2016 and Feedback from the FDA for Lutathera®, an Investigational Treatment for Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“Advanced Accelerator Applications S.A. …an international specialist in Molecular Nuclear Medicine (MNM), today announced its financial results for the third quarter of 2016 and that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued feedback on its New Drug Application (NDA) for Lutathera® for the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs) in adults.”

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Excitement Continues to Build for Advances in Neuroendocrine Tumor Field

Excerpt:

“It’s been an exciting year thus far for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), with the FDA approving a new treatment regimen and more advancements on the horizon, according to James C. Yao, MD, a professor in the Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“In February, the FDA approved everolimus (Afinitor) as a treatment for patients with progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional NETs of GI or lung origin with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. The mTOR inhibitor has been approved since 2011 for unresectable or advanced pancreatic NETs.

“Meanwhile, the agency is evaluating Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate), a peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), for patients with gastroenteropancreatic NETs under its priority review program. Similarly, telotristat etiprate, a small-molecule tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, also is being considered under the FDA’s priority review program for carcinoid syndrome in patients with metastatic NETs.”

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Full Surgical Resection Should Be Performed Whenever Possible for Gastroenteropancreatic NETs

“Full surgical resection (R0) of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) is associated with a greater than 90% survival rate at five years, according to findings presented at the 2015 North American Neuroendocrine Tumor Society (NANETS) symposium. The rate of recurrence varied by tumor location and stage, but the majority of patients with all types of NETs who underwent full resection were still free of recurrence in the five-year time frame.

“ ‘The presence of metastatic disease does not seem as though it should deter attempts at R0 resection when it’s feasible,’ according to lead author Katherine Van Loon, MD, MPH, a gastrointestinal cancer specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, Medical Center. She noted that there were differences in disease-free survival in patients who had NETs in the pancreas and small bowel depending on their stage at diagnosis, but a significant difference in overall survival was not detected.

“Current NCCN guidelines recommend that patients with gastrointestinal NETs undergo complete resection of the primary tumor and metastases whenever possible, but until now, large multicenter studies looking at recurrence rates in patients who undergo this procedure have not be conducted.”


Hormone-Mimicking Drugs Are Used To Treat Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (GEP-NETs)


Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) can arise wherever neuroendocrine (hormone-producing) cells are found—which is in most organs. Most NETs (65%-70%) are gastroenteropancreatic, or GEP, arising in different gastrointestinal organs. GEP-NETs are most commonly found in the small bowel (including the appendix), stomach, and rectum. Still, NETs in general are rare, which complicates the development of new treatments and identification of the genetic drivers of these cancers. Treatment of GEP-NETs is clearly an unmet medical need, and is now even more urgent because their incidence has been on the rise in the last 20 years. Continue reading…


FDA Grants Priority Review to Lanreotide Injection for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

Editor’s note: In the U.S., a drug must be approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in order for it to be prescribed to patients with specific diseases. Particularly promising drugs might be granted Priority Review, meaning that the FDA agrees to work with the drug manufacturer to accelerate the approval process. The FDA recently granted priority review to a drug meant to treat a subset of pancreatic cancer tumors known as gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The drug is called lanreotide (aka Somatuline Depot). The FDA’s decision was based on promising results for the lanreotide in a clinical trial that tested it in volunteer patients.

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted and granted priority review to Ipsen’s supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) for the somatostatin analog lanreotide (Somatuline Depot) 120 mg injection in the treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. The FDA designates priority review status to drug candidates that have the potential to offer a significant improvement in treatment compared to currently approved options. A decision is expected in early 2015.

“In the United States, lanreotide is indicated for the long-term treatment of patients with acromegaly who have had an inadequate response to or cannot be treated with surgery and/or radiotherapy. The active substance in the drug is lanreotide acetate, a somatostatin analog that inhibits the secretion of several endocrine, exocrine, and paracrine amines and peptides.

“ ‘[Lanreotide] is the first and only somatostatin analog to demonstrate a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in a large, multinational clinical trial,’ said Cynthia Schwalm, President and CEO of Ipsen North America.”