The Scientist Discusses Cancer Commons in Self-Tracking Article

Reporter Kerry Grens mentions Cancer Commons in a recent article in The Scientist. The piece explores the trend of self-tracking—monitoring one’s health over time using a variety of cutting-edge and traditional procedures, including genotyping, gut microbiome sequencing, hormone level measurement, heart rate variability tracking, weight measurement, and more. From the article:

“To further research, organizations have tapped into people’s interest in sharing personal data. Cancer Commons, a large network of cancer researchers, appeals to patients and their physicians to submit individual data on treatment, cancer genotype, and outcomes.”

Read the full article here.


Mathematical Method Of Simplifying And Interpreting Genome Data De-Clutters Cancer-Cell Data, Revealing Tumor Evolution, Treatment Leads

“In our daily lives, clutter is something that gets in our way, something that makes it harder for us to accomplish things. For doctors and scientists trying to parse mountains of raw biological data, clutter is more than a nuisance; it can stand in the way of figuring out how best to treat someone who is very sick. Using increasingly cheap and rapid methods to read the billions of ‘letters’ that comprise human genomes – including the genomes of individual cells sampled from cancerous tumors – scientists are generating far more data than they can easily interpret.”


Mathematical Method Of Simplifying And Interpreting Genome Data De-Clutters Cancer-Cell Data, Revealing Tumor Evolution, Treatment Leads

“In our daily lives, clutter is something that gets in our way, something that makes it harder for us to accomplish things. For doctors and scientists trying to parse mountains of raw biological data, clutter is more than a nuisance; it can stand in the way of figuring out how best to treat someone who is very sick. Using increasingly cheap and rapid methods to read the billions of ‘letters’ that comprise human genomes – including the genomes of individual cells sampled from cancerous tumors – scientists are generating far more data than they can easily interpret.”


Mathematical Method Of Simplifying And Interpreting Genome Data De-Clutters Cancer-Cell Data, Revealing Tumor Evolution, Treatment Leads

“In our daily lives, clutter is something that gets in our way, something that makes it harder for us to accomplish things. For doctors and scientists trying to parse mountains of raw biological data, clutter is more than a nuisance; it can stand in the way of figuring out how best to treat someone who is very sick. Using increasingly cheap and rapid methods to read the billions of ‘letters’ that comprise human genomes – including the genomes of individual cells sampled from cancerous tumors – scientists are generating far more data than they can easily interpret.”