Genome Analysis Helps Keep Deadly Brain Cancer at Bay for Five Years

Excerpt:

“An analysis of a patient’s deadly brain tumor helped doctors at Smilow Cancer Hospital identify new emerging mutations and keep a 55-year old woman alive for more than five years, researchers report in the journal Genome Medicine.

“The median survival rate for patients with glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is only 15 months, but three separate genomic analyses of the tumor identified new mutations that allowed doctors to adjust treatment and keep the patient alive for over five years, through two recurrences of the cancer.”

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A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


How Cancer Spreads: Metastatic Tumor a Hybrid of Cancer Cell and White Blood Cell

“Yale Cancer Center scientists, together with colleagues at the Denver Police Crime Lab and the University of Colorado, have found evidence that a human metastatic tumor can arise when a leukocyte (white blood cell) and a cancer cell fuse to form a genetic hybrid. Their study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, may answer the question of how cancer cells travel from the primary tumor’s site of origin to distant organs and tissues of the body—the deadly process of metastasis.”