Genetic Test Firm to Put Customers’ Data in Public Domain

“In an unusual move, a leading genetic testing company is putting genetic information from the people it has tested into the public domain, a move the company says could make a large trove of data available to researchers looking for genes linked to various diseases.

“The company, Ambry Genetics, is expected to announce on Tuesday that it will put information from 10,000 of its customers into a publicly available database called AmbryShare.

“ ‘We’re going to discover a lot of new diagnostic targets and a lot of new drug targets,’ Aaron Elliott, interim chief scientific officer at Ambry, which is based in Southern California, said in an interview. ‘With our volume, we can pull out a significant number of genes just by the sheer number we are looking at.’ “


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


Genomic Profiling Defines Subtypes of Prostate Cancer with the Potential for Therapeutic Stratification

“The remarkable variation in prostate cancer clinical behavior represents an opportunity to identify and understand molecular features that can be used to stratify patients into clinical subgroups for more precise outcome prediction and treatment selection. Significant progress has been made in recent years in establishing the composition of genomic and epigenetic alterations in localized and advanced prostate cancers using array-based technologies and next-generation sequencing approaches. The results of these efforts shed new light on our understanding of this disease and point to subclasses of prostate cancer that exhibit distinct vulnerabilities to therapeutics. The goal of this review is to categorize the genomic data and, where available, corresponding expression, functional, or related therapeutic information, from recent large-scale and in-depth studies that show a new appreciation for the molecular complexity of this disease.”