Combining CAR T Cells With Existing Immunotherapies May Overcome Resistance in Glioblastomas

Excerpt:

“Genetically modified “hunter” T cells successfully migrated to and penetrated a deadly type of brain tumor known as glioblastoma (GBM) in a clinical trial of the new therapy, but the cells triggered an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment and faced a complex mutational landscape that will need to be overcome to better treat this aggressive cancer, Penn Medicine researchers report in a new study this week in Science Translational Medicine.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


“Trojan Horse” Tested in EGFR-Amplified Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“Investigators are seeking to determine whether the addition of ABT-414, an antibody–drug conjugate, to concomitant radiotherapy and temozolomide will improve the survival of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification.

“The phase IIb/III Intellance1 trial (NCT02573324), which is currently recruiting participants, seeks to randomize approximately 720 patients to a 2-phase experimental arm with ABT-414 or to a placebo comparator arm. Participants in the experimental arm will receive intravenous ABT-414 combined with standard therapy of oral temozolomide and radiation in a chemoradiation treatment phase, followed by ABT-414 plus oral temozolomide during an adjuvant treatment phase. The comparator arm will follow the same regimens, with an intravenous placebo to replace ABT-414.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Malaria Drug Improves Efficacy of Glioblastoma Treatment

Excerpt:

“A treatment regimen that included the inexpensive anti-malaria drug chloroquine dramatically improved survival and quality of life for three patients with glioblastoma, according to researchers from University of Colorado Cancer Center.

“Two of the patients maintained response to treatment for more than 2 years.

” ‘We were excited that the three patients who tried the combination all had some clinical benefit,’ Jean Mulcahy Levy, MD, investigator at University of Colorado Cancer Center and pediatric oncologist at Children’s Hospital Colorado, told HemOnc Today. ‘This supports examining this combination in a broader clinical trial and assessing its efficacy in a larger patient population.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Seven Updates in Neuro-Oncology

Excerpt:

“The National Brain Tumor Society is calling for volunteers, patients, families, public policy advocates and physicians to act and join the society’s ‘brain tumor team’ this month.

“As a part of National Brain Tumor Awareness month, the society has promoted the annual campaign — this year titled “#BTAM = #BTeAM in 2017” — to raise awareness.

“In conjunction with Brain Tumor Awareness Month, HemOnc Today presents seven updates within neuro-oncology.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Vaccines Based on Immunotherapies Being Tested in Phase 2 Trials in Brain Cancer

Excerpt:

Immunomic Therapeutics has entered an exclusive licensing agreement with Annias Immunotherapeutics for the rights to use Annia’s intellectual property regarding an immunotherapy based on antigens of cytomegalovirus (CMV). Both companies are developing new approaches for generating vaccines for cancer.

“Under the new licensing agreement, Immunomic will be able to combine LAMP-Vax, its investigational nucleic acid-based immunotherapy platform, with Annia’s CMV immunotherapy platform. Duke University’s John H. Sampson, MD, PhD, and Duane A. Mitchell, MD, PhD, developed this platform, which was later licensed to Annias.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Super Advocate: Stephen Western Helps Brain Cancer Patients Keep Up with the Latest Research


Stephen Western is a dedicated advocate for people dealing with brain cancer. He started this work in February 2013, when his friend was diagnosed with a type of brain tumor known as an astrocytoma. In order to help her, he began to learn all he could about the science of astrocytoma treatment.

Stephen soon realized that many more patients might benefit from his growing knowledge, so he created the website Astrocytoma Options to share this information and update it as new research emerges. He also helps run another site that focuses on the multi-drug “cocktails” often used in brain tumor treatment.

Although Stephen has no formal scientific training, he is able to help patients better understand their treatment options and stay up-to-date on the latest treatment research. To learn more about his work, I interviewed him via email: Continue reading…


Opdivo Fails to Demonstrate Survival Benefit in Phase 3 Brain Cancer Trial

Excerpt:

“Patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a type of brain cancer, who recurred following radiation therapy and Temodal (temozolomide), did not survive longer when treated with the PD-1 inhibitor Opdivo (nivolumab) compared to standard-of-care treatment with Avastin (bevacizumab).

The findings mean that the randomized CheckMate -143 Phase 3 trial (NCT02017717) has failed to meet its primary objective.

” ‘[Glioblastoma multiforme] is a historically difficult disease to treat and conventional treatment options have demonstrated limited responses,’ Fouad Namouni, MD, head of Oncology Development and head of Medical at Bristol-Myers Squibb, said in a news release. ‘We remain steadfast in our pursuit of treatments for diseases with the highest unmet need and continue our work to determine how our immuno-oncology agents can potentially improve outcomes for these patients.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Vaccine/Chemotherapy Combination Improves Survival in Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-targeted vaccination plus high-dose chemotherapy with temozolomide can lead to long-term progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM), according to a new study published in Clinical Care Research.

“Despite surgical resection, high-dose radiation, and chemotherapy with temozolomide, GBM patients typically survive a median of 15 months. CMV proteins are expressed in more than 90% of GBM. ‘Recent evidence has also demonstrated that CMV-specific T-cell immunity can be generated to recognize and effectively kill autologous GBM tumor cells expressing endogenous levels of the immunodominant pp65 antigen, providing compelling support for the development of CMV-directed immunotherapy for the treatment of GBM,’ stated the researchers, led by Kristen A. Batich, MD, PhD, a researcher in the departments of neurosurgery and pathology at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


TTFields Significantly Improve Survival in GBM

Excerpt:

“A landmark analysis of findings from the EF-14 trial testing the efficacy and safety of tumor treating fields (TTFields) for the treatment of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has found that the risk of death was reduced by 37% and overall survival (OS) was extended by a median of 5 months with the use of the device.

“Two-, 3-, 4-, and 5-year overall and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for patients who received TTFields with adjuvant temozolomide were significantly improved over patients who received temozolomide alone, reported Roger Stupp, MD, professor of neurological surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and associate director for strategic initiatives at the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.