Laser Interstitial Thermal Therapy Shows Promise for Glioblastomas

Excerpt:

“Magnetic resonance imaging-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy (LITT) appears to be safe and effective for glioblastomas in select patients and may add an average of 2 months to life expectancy compared with the current standard of care, according to a new report published in the journal Neurosurgery.

” ‘We showed that the procedure is well tolerated and that recurrent patients had a meaningful clinical benefit that seems to be better when compared with previously published data on the current standard of care,’ said Eric Leuthardt, MD, senior study author and a professor of neurosurgery, neuroscience, biomedical engineering, and mechanical engineering & applied science at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri.”

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Options to Treat a Glioblastoma

A Q&A with Al Musella, DPM, President, Musella Foundation For Brain Tumor Research & Information, Inc., Hewlett, NY; email: musella@virtualtrials.com, phone: 888-295-4740

Q: You direct an established foundation that supports research and information about brain tumors. What would you do if you yourself were diagnosed with a glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)?

A: Now that GBMs are in the news again, I would like to discuss what I would do if it happened to me—a newly diagnosed GBM in an adult in otherwise good shape. There are several choices.

  1. Standard of care: Surgery, radiation, Temozolomide. Chance of 5 year survival is about 5%.
  2. Standard of care PLUS Optune. Bumps my chance of 5 year survival up to 24.9% (if used over 90% of the time) with no added toxicity.
  3. Phase 3 Clinical trials: There are now about nine phase 3 trials for newly diagnosed GBM. Some have impressive phase 1 and phase 2 data. By the time a treatment gets to phase 3, it has shown enough promise in earlier trials that the sponsor is willing to risk a lot of money to test in a phase 3 trial. Most have two big downsides: 1) Most have a control group of patients who receive the old standard of care so that some of the participants do not get the experimental treatment. 2) Most do not allow you to use Optune, so you are trading a known benefit for a chance at an unknown benefit.
  4. Continue reading…


First Patient Dosed in Phase I/II Trial of Novel Immunotherapy Combination in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“The first patient has been dosed in a phase I/II open-label, multicenter trial investigating a novel immunotherapy combination in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM). Fifty patients have been accrued in the trial, as of May 31, 2018, which will be conducted at 25 sites across the nation.

“This study aims to investigate the efficacy of INO-5401, a T-cell activating immunotherapy agent encoding multiple antigens in GBM, and INO-9012, an immune activator encoding IL-12, in combination with the PD-1 inhibitor cemiplimab (REGN2810).”

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Doctors Try Genetically Modified Poliovirus As Experimental Brain Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“A genetically modified poliovirus may help some patients fight a deadly form of brain cancer, researchers report.

“The experimental treatment seems to have extended survival in a small group of patients with glioblastoma who faced a grim prognosis because standard treatments had failed, Duke University researchers say.

” ‘I’ve been doing this for 50 years and I’ve never seen results like this,’ says Dr. Darell Bigner, the director emeritus of the The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at the Duke Cancer Institute, who is helping develop the treatment.”

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New Approach to Treating Glioblastoma Could Add Years to Patients’ Lives

Excerpt:

A new way of treating glioblastoma — the deadly brain tumor currently ailing Arizona Sen. John McCain — with a personalized vaccine is giving some patients in a clinical trial more time.

“The vaccination, called DCVax-L, is made out of a patient’s own cells and uses them to jumpstart the immune system and attack the tumor. In the trial, some patients survived for more than 36 months — more than a year and a half longer than current life expectancy after glioblastoma diagnosis.”

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MimiVax Announces Positive Interim Results from Phase II Trial of SurVaxM Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“MimiVax LLC, a clinical-stage biotechnology company developing immunotherapeutics and targeted therapies for cancer treatment, today announced positive interim results from a multicenter Phase II study of SurVaxM in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma (nGBM). These promising interim results support further development of SurVaxM in combination with standard therapy as a potential treatment for glioblastoma. A randomized trial of SurVaxM in glioblastoma is planned, pending completion of this study and review at the end of Q4 2018.”

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Study Evaluating VBI-1901 Enrolling Recurrent GBM Patients in Second Dose Group

Excerpt:

“An Independent Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB) unanimously recommended that the Phase 1/2 clinical trial evaluating VBI Vaccines’ VBI-1901 continue to enroll patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) in a second study arm.

“The positive review recommended the study continue without modification, after scanning through all safety data from the first group of patients, who received the lowest VBI-1901 dose. Enrollment now has commenced for the second, intermediate-dose study arm.”

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Carboxyamidotriazole Orotate Shows Promising Activity in Brain Cancers

Excerpt:

“Carboxyamidotriazole orotate (CTO) in combination with temozolomide (Temodar), with or without radiotherapy, produced positive safety and efficacy results in a phase Ib study of patients with glioblastoma (GBM) or anaplastic gliomas.

“Forty-two patients were divided into 2 cohorts and received treatment. Cohort 1 included 27 patients with recurrent, temozolomide-refractory anaplastic gliomas or GBM. Twenty-one patients were assigned to a regimen of 219 to 812.5 mg/m2 of once-daily CTO in escalating doses and 6 were assigned to a fixed daily dose of 600 mg of CTO. All 27 patients received 150 mg/m2 of temozolomide on days 1 to 5 of each 28-day cycle.”

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NCCN Guidelines Recommend Optune in Combination with Temozolomide as a Category 1 Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“NovoCure (NASDAQ: NVCR) announced today that the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) has updated its clinical practice guidelines to recommend Optune® in combination with temozolomide as a category 1 treatment for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) in its globally recognized Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology (NCCN Guidelines®) for Central Nervous System Cancers.

“NCCN panel members designated alternating electric field therapy, or Optune, as a Category 1 treatment recommendation for patients with newly diagnosed GBM in conjunction with temozolomide after maximal safe resection and completion of radiation therapy in patients with newly diagnosed GBM.”

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