Case Report: Adoptive T-Cell Tx Shows Promise in Glioblastoma

Excerpt:

“Treatment with autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells targeting the tumor-associated antigen interleukin-13 receptor alpha 2 (IL13Rα2) is associated with tumor regression in recurrent multifocal glioblastoma, according to a case report published in the Dec. 29 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Christine E. Brown, Ph.D., from the City of Hope Beckman Research Institute and Medical Center in Duarte, Calif., and colleagues describe their clinical experience with a patient with recurrent multifocal glioblastoma who received CAR-engineered T cells. Over 220 days, multiple infusions of CAR T cells were administered through two intracranial delivery routes: infusions into the resected tumor cavity followed by infusions into the ventricular system.”

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Cells Dripped into the Brain Help Man Fight a Deadly Cancer

Excerpt:

“A man with deadly brain cancer that had spread to his spine saw his tumors shrink and, for a time, completely vanish after a novel treatment to help his immune system attack his disease—another first in this promising field.

“The type of immunotherapy that 50-year-old Richard Grady received already has helped some people with blood cancers such as leukemia. But the way he was given it is new, and may allow its use not just for brain tumors but also other cancers that can spread, such as breast and lung.”

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How to Find Clinical Trials for Experimental Cancer Treatments

Excerpt:

“Who might benefit from a clinical trial for an experimental cancer treatment?

“A common misperception is that such trials are strictly for patients who have reached the end of the road and have no more hope of being helped by standard treatments.

” ‘But it’s not last-ditch,’ said Dina G. Lansey, the assistant director for diversity and inclusion in clinical research at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. New forms of immunotherapy are being tested in many types of cancer, and not just at late stages.”

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Some Glioblastoma Patients Benefit from ‘Ineffective’ Treatment

Excerpt:

“A subgroup of patients with a devastating brain tumor called glioblastoma multiforme benefited from treatment with a class of chemotherapy drugs that two previous large clinical trials indicated was ineffective against the disease, according to a study at the Stanford University School of Medicine.

“Specifically, patients in the subgroup who were treated with chemotherapy drugs that block the growth of new blood vessels in the tumor lived an average of about one year longer than those who were given other classes of chemotherapy drugs, the researchers found.”

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Scientists Find Three Subgroups in a Children’s Brain Cancer, Identify Druggable Targets

Excerpt:

“Multi-institutional researchers investigating an incurable brain cancer in children have discovered three distinct subgroups of disease and identified promising drugs to target each type.

“The research findings are published online today and depicted on the cover of Cancer Cell. Co-principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho, Scientist at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, says being able to segregate and classify specific subgroups opens the door to providing precision medicine for children who have a highly malignant, non-inherited type of brain cancer called atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumours (ATRTs).”

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Expert Details Promising Results of Antibody Drug Conjugate ABT-414 in Recurrent GBM

Excerpt:

“Phase 1 study results presented at the 21st Annual Scientific Meeting and Education Day of the Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) demonstrated the antibody drug conjugate ABT-414 has shown promising results for the treatment of patients with EGFR-amplified, recurrent glioblastoma (GBM).

“Lead author Martin van den Bent, MD, PhD, of the Erasmus MC Cancer Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands, is presenting the findings during the SNO meeting, which was held November 17-20, 2016, in Scottsdale, Arizona.

“In an interview with Targeted Oncology, van den Bent discussed the trial’s significant findings, that agent’s toxicity profile, and what lies ahead for the investigational agent.”

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Study Findings Show Role for Pembrolizumab and Durvalumab in GBM Treatment, Expert Says

Excerpt:

“Based on encouraging efficacy signals and safety data from separate trials exploring the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) and the PD-L1 inhibitor durvalumab (MEDI4736), there is a role for checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Data from the studies were reported by David Reardon, MD, at the 21st Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) Annual Scientific Meeting.

“Reardon said that these results mark important firsts in the field: ‘There has been a lot of anticipation regarding the role of checkpoint inhibitors for glioblastoma and whether we’ll see results in any way similar to the exciting results that have been observed in other cancer indications with this new class of cancer therapeutics.’ ”

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Durvalumab Demonstrates Durable Responses in Recurrent GBM

Excerpt:

“Findings from a recent phase II study showed the PD-L1 inhibitor durvalumab generated durable responses in bevacizumab-naïve patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Findings of the study were presented at the 2016 Society for Neuro-Oncology Annual Meeting.

“In a 30-patient cohort, the 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) rate was 20.0% (6 patients; 90% CI, 9.7-33.0). The median PFS was 13.9 weeks (95% CI, 8.1-24.0). Of these 6 patients, 3 had wild-type IDH1 status and 3 had mutated IDH1.”

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Proposed Phase II Trial Aims to Explore Optune System in Grade III Recurrent Glioma

Excerpt:

“Researchers are hoping that a proposed phase II study exploring use of the Optune system in patients with recurrent grade III malignant glioma will expand the indications for the tumor treating fields (TTFields) device beyond its current FDA-approved use in recurrent grade IV glioblastoma.

“Daniel O’Connell, MD, a neuro-oncologist at UCLA’s Geffen School of Medicine, discussed his proposal with Targeted Oncology at the 21st Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Neuro-Oncology (SNO) held November 17 to 20, 2016 in Scottsdale, Arizona.”

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