Nivolumab Combinations Feasible for Newly Diagnosed GBM

Excerpt:

“The PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab (Opdivo) was successfully combined with radiotherapy alone or concurrently with temozolomide for patients with newly-diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in cohorts 1c and 1d from the phase I CheckMate-143 study, according to findings presented at the 2016 Society for Neuro-Oncology Annual Meeting.

” ‘The research question was if treatment with nivolumab to block immune checkpoint pathways could potentiate an antitumor immune response and have synergistic effects with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed GBM,’ stated first author by Antonio Omuro, MD, of the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


The CAR T-Cell Treatment: Will It Work for Solid Tumors?


Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a new, immune system-based cancer treatment that has garnered recent media attention. In a clinical trial, CAR T-cell treatment left no signs of tumors in 70% to 90% of children and adults with the aggressive blood cancer acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). ALL is almost always fatal, and the results observed with CAR T-cell treatment are nothing short of spectacular. Continue reading…


Confronting the Most Aggressive, Evasive, and Cunning of All Brain Tumors

“Cody Mahan and his family didn’t think they would have to deal with cancer again so soon.”After graduating college, Mahan, 23, had earned a prestigious Department of Defense SMART scholarship and had just started working at Warner Robins Air Force Base. He was looking forward to a promising engineering career.

“In December, he started to experience headaches and then pain in his neck. His family took him to a hospital close to where they lived in Tennessee, suspecting meningitis. Doctors discovered a tumor on the right side of his brain. ‘It was quite a shock,’ says Cody’s mother, Lisa. ‘It was the furthest thing from our minds when we went to the ER.’

“They had thought cancer was behind them. As a teenager, Mahan had ALL () and had received full cranial radiation as part of his treatment. At the time, this was a standard prophylactic for patients with ALL. The radiation, his family suspects, may have led to the development of the brain tumor. In fact, is one of the only known risk factors for developing a brain tumor.”

Editor’s note: This well-written story describes a new approach to glioblastoma surgery.


Dutch Phase II Study Supports Phase III Evaluation of Bevacizumab Plus Lomustine, but Not Bevacizumab Alone, in Recurrent Glioblastoma

The gist: Researchers conducted a clinical trial with volunteer patients to test two drugs, alone and in combination, for recurrent glioblastoma. The two drugs tested were bevacizumab (aka Avastin) and lomustine (aka CeeNU). The researchers found promising results for patients who took both bevacizumab and lomustine, and recommend that further clinical trials be conducted to continue to study the new combination treatment. The patients who participated in the study all had glioblastoma that was treated with temozolomide chemoradiotherapy, but recurred.

“Bevacizumab (Avastin) is frequently used in patients with recurrent glioblastoma, although it is unclear whether responses observed with such treatment result in improved overall survival. In the phase II Dutch BELOB study reported in The Lancet Oncology, Taal et al found that overall survival results supported phase III evaluation of the combination of bevacizumab and lomustine (CeeNU) but not bevacizumab monotherapy…

“In this open-label trial, 153 adult patients from 14 Dutch hospitals with a first recurrence of glioblastoma after temozolomide chemoradiotherapy were randomly assigned between December 2009 and November 2011 to receive oral lomustine at 110 mg/m2 once every 6 weeks, intravenous bevacizumab at 10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks, or combination treatment at the same doses. The primary endpoint outcome was overall survival at 9 months in the intent-to-treat population.

“A preplanned safety analysis after eight patients had received the combination regimen showed that three had grade 3 and two had grade 4 thrombocytopenia, with these toxicities requiring a reduction in bevacizumab dose intensity. The lomustine dose in the combination group was subsequently reduced to 90 mg/m2. In addition to the eight combination recipients getting the higher lomustine dose, 51 received bevacizumab alone, 47 received lomustine alone, and 47 received bevacizumab plus lomustine at 90 mg/m2.

“The investigators concluded, ‘The combination of bevacizumab and lomustine met prespecified criteria for assessment of this treatment in further phase 3 studies. However, the results in the bevacizumab alone group do not justify further studies of this treatment.’ ”