Drugs Prevent Heart Damage During Breast Cancer Treatment, Study Show

Excerpt:

“Heart medication taken in combination with chemotherapy reduces the risk of serious cardiovascular damage in patients with early-stage breast cancer, according to results from a new landmark clinical trial.

“Existing research has shown some cancer therapies such as Herceptin greatly improve survival rates for early-stage breast cancer, but come with a fivefold risk of heart failure—a devastating condition as life-threatening as the cancer itself.

“A new five-year study, led by researchers at the University of Alberta and Alberta Health Services and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and Alberta Cancer Foundation, shows that two kinds of heart medications, beta blockers and ACE inhibitors, effectively prevent a drop in heart function from cancer treatment.”

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Heart Health After Cancer: A Growing Concern

“Nearly 15 million people are living after a cancer diagnosis in the United States. This number represent over 4 percent of the population, an astonishing figure. And a growing one, as reported last year by the ACS and outlined by the NCI’s Office of Cancer Survivorship.

“As cancer patients survive longer they face additional health problems. Radiation to the chest, chemotherapy, antibody therapy and hormone changes can affect blood vessels and heart function in the short term and long, during treatment or years later. But millions affected – and their physicians – remain insufficiently mindful about the risk of heart disease.

“It’s the kind of problem a person who’s had cancer, or a doctor who’s prescribed generally helpful treatment, may not want to think about.

“Years ago, heart complications of cancer treatment didn’t garner so much attention says, Dr. Javid Moslehi, a cardiologist who leads a program in cardio-oncology at the Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in Nashville, TN. The emerging field involves cardiologists, oncologists, scientists and others who study the long-term effects of cancer treatment on the heart.”