Clear Link Between Heavy Vitamin B Intake and Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“New research suggests long-term, high-dose supplementation with vitamins B6 and B12—long touted by the vitamin industry for increasing energy and improving metabolism—is associated with a two- to four-fold increased lung cancer risk in men relative to non-users.

“Risk was further elevated in male smokers taking more than 20 mg of B6 or 55 micrograms of B12 a day for 10 years. Male smokers taking B6 at this dose were three times more likely to develop  . Male smokers taking B12 at such doses were approximately four times more likely to develop the disease compared to non-users.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Medicare Will Cover CT Lung Cancer Screening

“Current and former heavy smokers ages 55 to 77 can undergo annual low-dose CT screening for lung cancer paid by Medicare, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services announced Thursday.

“The decision finalizes a preliminary plan the agency released in November with one important difference: a higher upper limit to the age range, which had previously been set at 74.

“As in the draft plan, individuals must still have a 30 pack-year history of smoking to qualify and must either be smoking currently or have quit in the past 15 years.

“Also, beneficiaries must obtain a written order from a physician for the first screening, stipulating that the patient underwent counseling on lung cancer screening and that it involved a shared decision-making process. Subsequent annual screenings will also require similar written orders.

“The counseling sessions must emphasize the importance of continued abstinence for ex-smokers and cessation for current smokers.”


Link between heavy smokers and prostate cancer found in European study

Compared with never smokers, current smokers had a reduced risk of prostate cancer which was statistically significant for localised and low-grade disease, but not for advanced or high-grade disease. In contrast, heavy smokers (25+ cigarettes per day) and men who had smoked for a long time (40+ years) had a higher risk of prostate cancer death.