Brain Mets Can Acquire HER2-Positivity in HER2-Negative Breast Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

“Brain metastases from primary breast cancer tumors often acquire clinically actionable genetic alterations, according to a small study. About one fifth of ERBB2/HER2-negative cases switched to HER2-positivity in the brain metastases.

” ‘Limited therapeutic options exist for patients with brain metastases,’ wrote study authors led by Nolan Priedigkeit, BS, of the University of Pittsburgh. ‘ERBB2/HER2-positive brain metastases have demonstrated encouraging responses to ERBB2/HER2-targeted therapies in recent clinical trials.’ ERBB2/HER2-negative brain metastases, however, have shown no such response.”

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Tucatinib (ONT-380) Progressing in Pivotal Trial Against HER2+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Phase 1 clinical trial data published this week in the journal Clinical Cancer Research show early promise of the investigational anti-cancer agent tucatinib (formerly ONT-380) against HER2+ breast cancer. The 50 women treated had progressed despite a median 5 previous treatment regimens. Twenty-seven percent of these heavily pretreated patients saw clinical benefit from the drug, with at least ‘stable disease’ at 24 or more weeks after the start of treatment. These data have led to two subsequent Phase Ib studies, resulting in tucatinib earning FDA fast-track status and the expansion of this study once meant only to demonstrate drug safety into the “pivotal” trial that will determine approval.”

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Three-Drug Breast Cancer Regimen Slows Progression

Excerpt:

“Adding a drug to a standard regimen for hormone receptor (HR)-positive and HER2-positive breast cancer improved progression-free survival, a researcher said here.

“In a Phase II randomized trial, investigators compared an aromatase inhibitor (AI) combined with pertuzumab (Perjeta) and trastuzumab (Herceptin) versus an AI just with trastuzumab in women with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, Grazia Arpino, MD, PhD, of the University of Naples Federico II in Italy, reported at a general session at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“The three-drug combination led to a median of 18.89 months without progression, compared with 15.8 months for the two drugs.”

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A Breast Cancer Drug That Gets In The Brain? Cascadian Sees A Way Forward

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer patients sometimes end up dying when their tumors spread all the way to the brain. Some very good drugs already exist for patients with breast cancer, especially ones with tumors that overexpress the HER2 marker, but that success has raised a new question: Can drugmakers take another step, and fight those deadly brain metastases that get people in the end?

“Seattle-based Cascadian Therapeutics is testing that idea this week with researchers gathered at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Cascadian is reporting today that patients who got conventional capecitabine and trastuzumab, plus an experimental small-molecule drug, tucatinib (aka ONT-380), lived a median of 7.8 months without their tumors getting worse. About 61% of patients on that triple-drug combo saw tumors shrink. It’s an impressive result, given that these patients were especially ill when they enrolled in the study, having already received a median of three prior rounds of HER2-targeted therapy. The data are also holding up over time: a snapshot of the data from June showed patients living a median of 6.3 months without their tumors spreading.”

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Novel HER2-Targeting Antibody-Drug Conjugate Shows Broad Antitumor Activity

Excerpt:

“A novel HER2-targeting antibody-drug conjugate showed promising antitumor activity across multiple tumor types, including HER2-postive breast cancer, according to phase I data presented at the 2016 ESMO Congress.

” ‘Antibody-drug conjugates represent promising drugs with a wider therapeutic window by effecting efficient and specific drug delivery to oncogene expressing tumor cells,’ explained lead author Kenji Tamura, MD, PhD, chairman, Department of Breast and Medical Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo, Japan.”

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Study Findings Provide Latest Data on Neoadjuvant HER2+ Breast Cancer Treatment

Excerpt:

“Results from the KRISTINE and NSABP B-41 trials provided the latest data on the use of pertuzumab (Perjeta), trastuzumab (Herceptin), ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1; Kadcyla), and lapatinib (Tykerb) for the neoadjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

“In a lecture at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting, Stephen K. Chia, MD, an assistant professor in the division of Medical Oncology at the University of British Columbia, highlighted the key findings from these trials and their implications for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer.”

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Expert Discusses Latest Data in Neoadjuvant HER2+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Results from the KRISTINE and NSABP B-41 trials presented at the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting provided the latest data on the use of pertuzumab (Perjeta), trastuzumab (Herceptin), ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1; Kadcyla), and lapatinib (Tykerb) for the neoadjuvant treatment of patients with HER2-positive breast cancer.

“In a lecture at the conference, Stephen K. Chia, MD, an assistant professor in the division of Medical Oncology at the University of British Columbia, highlighted the key findings from these trials and their implications for the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer.”

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FDA Accepts Neratinib NDA for HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA has accepted a new drug application (NDA) for neratinib as an extended adjuvant therapy for patients with HER2-positive breast cancer following prior treatment with postoperative trastuzumab (Herceptin), according to a statement from the developer of the TKI, Puma Biotechnology.

“The application included findings from the phase III ExteNET study, in which neratinib demonstrated a 2-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of 93.9% compared with 91.6% in the placebo arm, according to findings published in Lancet Oncology. The FDA completes a standard review within 12 months from the time of submission, which was completed for neratinib on July 21, 2016.”

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EMA Validation Puts Neratinib One Step Closer to Approval for HER2+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The developer of neratinib, Puma Biotechnology, has announced the European Medicines Agency (EMA) has validated the marketing authorization application for neratinib as a potential extended adjuvant therapy for patients with HER2-positive early stage breast cancer following 12 months of trastuzumab (Herceptin).

“The validation confirms the completion of the submission process and starts the formal review by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) and the subsequent final approval decision by the European Commission.

“The application was based on findings from the phase III ExteNET study, which were published in the Lancet Oncology. In this study, extended treatment with neratinib demonstrated a 2-year disease-free survival (DFS) rate of 93.9% compared with 91.6% in the placebo arm, representing a 33% improvement versus placebo (HR, 0.67; P = .009).”

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