Six Months Hormone Therapy in Addition to Radiotherapy Improves Prostate Cancer Survival

“Vienna, Austria: Men with prostate cancer that is small and confined to the prostate gland but that is at risk of growing and spreading, do better if they are treated with radiotherapy combined with androgen deprivation therapy, which lowers their levels of the male hormone, testosterone, according to new research.”


Should the Primary Tumor Be Treated in Patients With Metastatic Prostate Cancer?

“Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center hope to determine whether treating the primary tumor has any oncologic benefit in patients with metastatic prostate cancer.

“A new clinical trial aims to find which patients, if any, are most likely to benefit from such treatment.

“The prostate tumor usually is not treated in patients with metastatic disease unless the tumor progresses and causes local symptoms. Instead, patients typically undergo a sequence of systemic therapies, starting with hormone therapy (also called androgen deprivation), which can be done by orchiectomy but is most often done with injections of luteinizing hormone–releasing hormone agonists or antagonists. Unfortunately, complications from local progression occur in 30%–45% of patients whose primary prostate tumors have not been previously treated with radiation or surgery.”

Editor’s note: We previously posted a story that showed that treating the primary tumor may prolong survival times for some with metastatic prostate cancer.


Enzalutamide Improved Outcomes in Prostate Cancer Regardless of Age

“Enzalutamide significantly prolonged OS, radiographic PFS and time to PSA progression in both younger and older patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to a post-hoc analysis of the phase 3 AFFIRM trial.

“The original analysis of the randomized, double blind trial indicated that patients with prostate cancer who previously received docetaxel chemotherapy demonstrated improved median OS when treated with enzalutamide (Xtandi, Astellas Pharma) — an oral androgen receptor inhibitor — compared with patients assigned placebo (18.4 months vs. 13.6 months; HR=0.63; 95% CI, 0.53-0.75).”


Hormone Therapy Linked to Better Survival after Lung Cancer Diagnosis in Women

“Survival among people with lung cancer has been better for women than men, and the findings of a recent study indicate that female hormones may be a factor in this difference. The combination of estrogen plus progesterone and the use of long-term hormone therapy were associated with the most significant improvements in survival.

“The study was designed to explore the influence of several reproductive and hormonal factors on overall survival of women with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). After adjusting for stage of disease at diagnosis, treatment type (surgery or radiation), smoking status, age, race, and education level, the only factor studied that predicted survival after a diagnosis of NSCLC was use of hormone therapy.”


Prostate Cancer Advance Could Improve Treatment Options

“Researchers have made an important advance in understanding genetic changes associated with terminal prostate cancer. The research highlights why relapses could happen in some men following hormone therapy. And it could help identify those patients that will develop fatal prostate cancer much earlier for life-extending therapy.”


Increased Survival for Metastatic Prostate Cancer with Chemotherapy, Hormone Therapy Together

“Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel, given at the start of standard hormone therapy, lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported randomized, controlled clinical trial. The independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee overseeing the trial recommended to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the NIH, that the study results be made public because a recent planned interim analysis showed prolongation in overall survival. Full details from this early analysis will be presented at a scientific meeting in 2014 and in a peer-reviewed publication.”


NIH-Funded Study Shows Increased Survival in Men with Metastatic Prostate Cancer Who Receive Chemotherapy When Starting Hormone Therapy

“Men with hormone-sensitive metastatic prostate cancer who received the chemotherapy drug docetaxel given at the start of standard hormone therapy lived longer than patients who received hormone therapy alone, according to early results from a National Institutes of Health (NIH)-supported randomized, controlled clinical trial. The independent Data and Safety Monitoring Committee overseeing the trial recommended to the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of NIH, that the study results be made public because a recent planned interim analysis showed the prolongation in overall survival. Full details from this early analysis will be presented at a scientific meeting in 2014 and in a peer-reviewed publication.”

 


Prostate Cancer Deaths Fall by a Fifth in the Last 20 Years

“Death rates from prostate cancer have fallen by 20% since the early 1990s according to new figures released by Cancer Research UK.  At their peak in the early 1990s, there were around 30 deaths per 100,000 men, but this figure has fallen to around 24 deaths per 100,000. The downward trend is largely as a result of new approaches to treating prostate cancer such as earlier, more widespread use of hormone therapy, radical surgery, and radiotherapy, as well as the earlier diagnosis of some cancers linked to the use of the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test.”


Usual 'Hot Flash' Therapies Don't Help Prostate Cancer Patients: Study

“Treatments that ease hot flashes in menopausal women are not effective against hot flashes in men undergoing hormone therapy for prostate cancer, a new study finds. Hormone therapy in prostate cancer patients reduces levels of male hormones (androgens) to prevent them from reaching prostate cancer cells and stimulating cancer growth. Hot flashes occur in about 80% of prostate cancer patients undergoing hormone therapy.”