Neoadjuvant T-DM1 Improves pCR in HER2+/HR+ Early Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Twelve weeks of neoadjuvant T-DM1 (ado-trastuzumab emtansine; Kadcyla) with or without endocrine therapy induced superior pathologic complete response (pCR) compared with trastuzumab (Herceptin) plus endocrine therapy in patients with HER2-positive/HR-positive early breast cancer, according to findings recently published online in theJournal of Clinical Oncology.

“In the prospective, neoadjuvant phase II ADAPT trial conducted by the West German Study Group, pCR was 41.0% for patients assigned to T-DM1 alone and 41.5% for those who received T-DM1 and endocrine therapy. In contrast, 15.1% of patients assigned to trastuzumab and endocrine therapy had a pCR (P<.001).”

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ASCO 2017: I-SPY 2 Trial: Combination of Pembrolizumab Plus Standard Neoadjuvant Therapy in High-Risk Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“At the 2017 ASCO Annual Meeting, results were presented from the phase II I-SPY 2 trial investigating pembrolizumab (Keytruda) in combination with standard therapy (paclitaxel followed by doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide) as a neoadjuvant treatment for patients with locally advanced triple-negative breast cancer or hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative breast cancer (Abstract 506).

“Findings showed that the addition of pembrolizumab increased the estimated pathologic complete response rate nearly threefold in patients with triple-negative breast cancer (60% vs 20%) and in patients with hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative breast cancer (34% vs 13%) compared to standard therapy. Overall, based on Bayesian predictive probability of success in a confirmatory phase III trial, pembrolizumab has graduated from the I-SPY 2 TRIAL for all signatures in which it was tested (triple-negative breast cancer, all HER2-negative, and hormone receptor–positive/HER2-negative).”

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Dual HER2 Blockade Superior to Single Blockade for HER2+/HR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Dual blockade of HER2 with lapatinib plus trastuzumab and an aromatase inhibitor (AI) was superior to single blockade with trastuzumab plus an AI in postmenopausal women with HER2-positive, hormone receptor (HR)-positive metastatic breast cancer, according to the results of the phase III ALTERNATIVE study (abstract 1004) presented at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting, held June 2–6 in Chicago.

” ‘Dual HER2 blockade with this triplet of lapatinib/trastuzumab and an AI can offer an effective and well-tolerated chemotherapy-sparing option for patients who are not intended or appropriate for chemotherapy,’ said researcher William J. Gradishar, MD, of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center at Northwestern University in Chicago, who presented the results.”

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Lilly Builds Upon Body of Data for Abemaciclib with Phase 3 MONARCH 2 Data Demonstrating Superior Progression-Free Survival in Advanced Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) today announced that results from the Phase 3 MONARCH 2 study showed that abemaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)4 & 6 inhibitor, in combination with fulvestrant, significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS) compared to treatment with fulvestrant alone in women with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-), advanced breast cancer who have relapsed or progressed after endocrine therapy (median PFS, 16.4 vs. 9.3 months, respectively, HR: 0.553; 95% CI: 0.449, 0.681, P < .0000001). The data were presented at the 2017 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting (Abstract #1000) and simultaneously published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.”

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Expert Explains Individualized Decision on Endocrine Therapy Beyond 5 Years in Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Endocrine therapy remains an integral part of the treatment paradigm for patients with estrogen receptor (ER)–positive breast cancer; however, questions remain on which patients should continue their therapy beyond 5 years.

” ‘The idea [is] that most patients with hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer who are still on endocrine therapy at 5 years are going to merit some sort of discussion about whether they should continue or not, and it is okay to individualize that decision on the basis of the patient preferences, side effects, and symptom burden,’ said Amye J. Tevaarwerk, MD.”

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FDA Approves Co-Packaging of Ribociclib With Letrozole for Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA has approved co-packaging of the oral medications ribociclib (Kisqali) and letrozole (Femara) for the treatment of postmenopausal women with HR-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer.

“With the new Kisqali Femara Co-Pack, patients can obtain a full 28-day cycle of the 2 medicines in 1 package with 1 prescription and 1 copay, and the cost will be the same as that for Kisqali alone, according to Novartis, which manufactures both medications.”

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Ribociclib Response Unaffected by Prior Treatment

Excerpt:

“The FDA recently approved ribociclib (Kisqali) for use in combination with an aromatase inhibitor as initial therapy for treatment of postmenopausal women with HR+/HER2-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer.

“Ribociclib, an inhibitor of CDK4/6, was approved based on data from the phase III MONALEESA-2 trial, which was ended early following the first preplanned interim analysis. In this analysis, the combination of ribociclib and the aromatase inhibitor letrozole met the trial’s primary endpoint by demonstrating statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) compared to letrozole alone.”

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Chemotherapy May Not Be Necessary for Intermediate-Risk, Early-Stage Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Women with early-stage breast cancer and an intermediate risk recurrence score from a 21-gene expression assay may be able to avoid chemotherapy, according to a retrospective study published in Cancer.

” ‘Through years of research discoveries, it became clear that we were overtreating many women with breast cancer, especially those with early-stage breast cancer,’ Carlos H. Barcenas, MD, assistant professor of breast medical oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, said in a press release. ‘In addition to chemotherapy’s obvious side effects, there were also long-term complications for these women as survivors.’ ”

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Continuous Low-Dose Ribociclib Active in Advanced Breast Cancer Causes Less Neutropenia

Excerpt:

“Continuous low-dose ribociclib shows preliminary activity, and has an acceptable safety profile as an alternative to intermittent ribociclib dosing when combined with fulvestrant in the treatment of postmenopausal women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer.

“A phase Ib study, presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium, demonstrated a confirmed partial response (PR) of 13.3% in the continuous ribociclib arm, compared with 23.1% in the intermittent ribociclib arm, but a lower rate of high-grade neutropenia in patients receiving continuous dosing of ribociclib.”

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