Hormonal Drugs for Prostate Cancer Increase Risk, Incidence of Cardiovascular Events

“Patients who received hormonal regimens for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer experienced a significant increase in incidence of and relative risk for cardiovascular toxicity, according to results of a meta-analysis.

“Roberto Iacovelli, MD, medical oncologist in the division of urogenital and head and neck tumors at European Institute of Oncology in Milan, and colleagues sought to define the incidence and RR of cardiovascular events in a population of patients treated with new hormonal therapies for metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

“Incidence of all-grade toxicities (grades 1-4) and high-grade toxicities (grade 3-4) served as the primary outcome of the study.

“Iacovelli and colleagues identified six prospective phase 2 or phase 3 studies that included a total of 7,830 patients. Within each study, researchers considered treatment with a novel hormonal agent plus prednisone in the experimental arm (n = 4,520) and placebo plus prednisone (n = 3,310) as the control.”


Cyramza Yields a Modest Survival Benefit in Second-line NSCLC

“Cyramza™ (ramucirumab, IMC-1121B; Eli Lilly) is a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody directed against the extracellular domain of VEGFR-2. It was recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for advanced gastric cancer or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. On February 19, 2014, Lilly announced via press release that the REVEL trial was positive for both overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) benefit. Results from the randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled Phase III REVEL trial (NCT01168973) were reported at the 2014 annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). The trial evaluated docetaxel with or without Cyramza in squamous or non-squamous Stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients following disease progression after one prior platinum-based therapy.”

Editor’s note: A new targeted drug called Cyramza (aka ramucirumab) shows promise as a potential treatment for people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In a clinical trial, scientists tested the drug on volunteer patients with stage IV NSCLC. Compared to standard chemotherapy alone, patients who were treated with chemo plus Cyramza lived longer and had more time pass before their cancer worsened.

Update 6/9/14: According to Dr. Jack West of GRACE, the benefit of Cyramza is very minimal in the above-mentioned clinical trial, and is therefore not so promising.


Hypertension Related to New Cancer Therapies – A New Syndrome Emerges

“New cancer therapies, particularly agents that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, have improved the outlook for patients with some cancers and are now used as a first line therapy for some tumors. However, almost 100% of patients who take VEGF inhibitors (VEGFIs) develop high blood pressure, and a subset develops severe hypertension. The mechanisms underlying VEGF inhibitor-induced hypertension need to be better understood and there is a need for clear guidelines and improved management, say investigators in a review article published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.”


Hypertension Related to New Cancer Therapies – A New Syndrome Emerges

“New cancer therapies, particularly agents that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, have improved the outlook for patients with some cancers and are now used as a first line therapy for some tumors. However, almost 100% of patients who take VEGF inhibitors (VEGFIs) develop high blood pressure, and a subset develops severe hypertension. The mechanisms underlying VEGF inhibitor-induced hypertension need to be better understood and there is a need for clear guidelines and improved management, say investigators in a review article published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.”


Hypertension Related to New Cancer Therapies – A New Syndrome Emerges

“New cancer therapies, particularly agents that block vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling, have improved the outlook for patients with some cancers and are now used as a first line therapy for some tumors. However, almost 100% of patients who take VEGF inhibitors (VEGFIs) develop high blood pressure, and a subset develops severe hypertension. The mechanisms underlying VEGF inhibitor-induced hypertension need to be better understood and there is a need for clear guidelines and improved management, say investigators in a review article published in the Canadian Journal of Cardiology.”