Mutation Linked to Less Risk of Spreading in Eye Melanomas

A genetic abnormality may help predict which melanomas in the eye are unlikely to spread, according to a study in Nature Genetics. The researchers found that nearly 20% of 102 people with eye melanomas had a mutation in a gene called SF3B1. These people were usually younger when diagnosed and their tumors were less likely to spread and become deadly.

Primary source: http://www.nature.com/ng/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/ng.2523.html


Researchers Write New Guide to Optimal Treatments for Melanomas with BRAF Mutations

Based on current data, researchers have developed a new treatment guide for melanomas with the most common mutations (BRAF V600). While these melanomas can be targeted with vemurafenib and dabrafenib, challenges remain. Not all tumors respond, some become resistant, and side effects can include another type of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. Other treatment options include trametinib, which targets a protein called MEK, as well as immunotherapies such as high-dose interleukin 2 and ipilimumab, both of which can control tumors completely.


Melanoma Can Still Recur When Lymph Nodes Test Clear

A JAMA Surgery study clarified when melanoma is likely to return in people determined to be cancer-free by sentinel lymph node biopsy. The researchers found that melanoma recurred in 16% of 515 such patients and that 4% of them had tumors in the lymph nodes that had been tested. Recurrence was more likely when the initial tumors were on the head or neck and were deeper (2.7 vs. 1.8 mm). Recurrence was less likely in women and in people who were younger when first diagnosed.


Melanoma Apps No Substitute for Doctors

A JAMA Dermatology study shows the dangers of using smartphone apps to self-diagnose melanomas. The researchers compared diagnoses of 60 melanomas and 128 benign lesions by a board-certified dermatopathologist to those of four apps. Three of the apps incorrectly said that 30% or more of the melanomas were harmless. The fourth app, which sent images to board-certified dermatologists, was better, but still misdiagnosed one of the melanomas as benign. These apps are not subject to regulatory oversight.

Primary source: http://archderm.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1557488#qundefined


First Evidence That the Immune System Can Halt Cancer Progession Permanently

New research in Nature shows that the immune system can control tumors permanently without destroying cells. The researchers treated cancers with two proteins that activate the immune system (interferon-g and tumor necrosis factor) and found that the combination kept tumors from growing by making the cells dormant. This work could ultimately lead to cancer treatments that are both effective and free of side effects, suggesting that we shift from the “war on cancer” strategy of killing tumor cells to focus instead on restoring the body’s innate ability to arrest tumor development.