ELCC 2016 Press Release: Immunotherapy With Live Bacterium Improves Response Rate in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

Excerpt:

“Immunotherapy with a live bacterium combined with chemotherapy demonstrated more than 90% disease control and 59% response rate in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM), according to the results of a phase Ib trial presented today at the European Lung Cancer Conference (ELCC) 2016 in Geneva, Switzerland.

“ ‘Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a cancer of the lining of the lung and is rare but difficult to treat,’ said Prof Thierry Jahan, professor of medicine at the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center in San Francisco, US. ‘Standard of care treatment with pemetrexed and platinum compound chemotherapy gets a 30% response rate but a modest impact on survival. So there is a clear unmet need in targeting this specific population.’

“Patients with MPM strongly express the mesothelin antigen in the tumour. CRS-207 is a live, attenuated Listeria monocytogenes bacterium that contains two gene deletions to diminish its pathogenicity and has also been engineered to express mesothelin.”

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Super Patient: Janet Freeman-Daily Joins a Clinical Trial—and Beats the Odds on Lung Cancer


In March 2011, Janet Freeman-Daily was about to take a long family trip to China. She’d been coughing for a while, so she asked her doctor for an antibiotic as a precaution before leaving. Even so, she came back in May with a respiratory infection that wouldn’t go away.

Her doctor ordered an X-ray and then a CT scan. “Before I got home, they called and said they’d like to do a bronchoscopy,” Janet says. The scan revealed a 7-cm mass in her left lung, and biopsies showed it was non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and that it had spread to several lymph nodes. Continue reading…


Video: Marty Tenenbaum Speaks at the ALCF's Lung Cancer Living Room Event

Earlier this year, Cancer Commons founder Marty Tenenbaum, PhD, spoke at the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation’s (ALCF) monthly Lung Cancer Living Room event. Marty’s own cancer diagnosis and treatment journey inspired his current mission: to make sure critical information is shared and gets to the patients who need it. By collecting data from thousands of patient-donated lung cancer stories, Cancer Commons can begin to show patients and doctors patterns in treatment choices, side effects, quality of life, outcomes, and more.

The video from the event is now available:

Lung Cancer Living Room 04-22-14 from Peninsula TV on Vimeo.

The ALCF, one of our partner organizations, works directly with individual lung cancer patients to ensure they each receive the best possible care. The Lung Cancer Living Room is a monthly in-person and online support group event that informs patients about lung cancer.

Click here for more information, including how to attend in person (in San Carlos, CA) or online. Click here to read the description of Marty’s upcoming event.


Study Identifies Novel Genomic Changes in the Most Common Type of Lung Cancer; TCGA Finds Mutations in a Key Cancer-Causing Pathway, Expanding Targets for Existing Drugs

Editor’s note: Cancer is caused by genetic mutations that lead to excess cell growth and tumor formation. Scientists have identified many specific cancer-causing mutations, and drugs have been developed to target and treat tumors with some of these specific mutations. Researchers recently found mutations in lung adenocarcinoma tumors that they had not seen in that type of cancer before. The discovery could eventually lead to new treatment options for some patients who have these mutations.

“Researchers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have identified novel mutations in a well-known cancer-causing pathway in lung adenocarcinoma, the most common subtype of lung cancer. Knowledge of these genomic changes may expand the number of possible therapeutic targets for this disease and potentially identify a greater number of patients with treatable mutations because many potent cancer drugs that target these mutations already exist.

“TCGA is jointly funded and managed by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), both part of the National Institutes of Health. A TCGA analysis of another, less common, form of lung cancer, squamous cell carcinoma, was reported in 2012.

“In this new study, published online July 9, 2014, in the journal Nature, researchers examined the genomes, RNA, and some protein from 230 lung adenocarcinoma samples. In three-quarters of the samples, the scientists ultimately identified mutations that put a cell signaling pathway known as the RTK/RAS/RAF pathway into overdrive.”


Experimental Breast Cancer Drug to be Trialled in Lung Cancer Patients

“A clinical trial using an experimental drug originally designed to treat breast cancer launches for patients with advanced lung cancer.

“The drug, called olaparib – a type of treatment called a PARP inhibitor – will be given after chemotherapy to patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) to see if it delays the growth of their tumour.

“The phase II trial will recruit over 100 people with advanced non-small cell lung cancer at 25 hospitals around the UK. It is funded by Cancer Research UK and AstraZeneca through a National Cancer Research Network initiative and is being co-ordinated by Cancer Research UK’s Wales Cancer Trials Unit at Cardiff University and Velindre NHS Trust in Cardiff.”

Editor’s Note: More and more, scientists are finding that different types of cancer (breast and lung cancer, for instance) can sometimes have similarities, meaning that a treatment that works for one type might also work for another type. This study is exploring once such treatment.