Atezolizumab Demonstrates Long-Term Responses in Subset of TNBC

Excerpt:

“According to the results of a phase I study of single agent anti-PD-L1 atezolizumab (Tecentriq) in metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC), ten percent of patients showed impressive long-term survival, although researchers said that aside from some biomarker evidence, it’s yet unclear why the drug was more effective in this subset of patients.

“Results of the study were presented this week at the AACR Annual Meeting 2017 by lead author Peter Schmid, MD, PhD, director of the St. Bartholomew’s Breast Centre at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital and Barts Cancer Institute in London.”

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Pembrolizumab Affords Long-Term Survival to One-Fourth of Selected Patients With NSCLC, Alternative Statistical Model Suggests

Excerpt:

“Statistical modeling of long-term survival from the KEYNOTE trials of the programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1)–inhibitor pembrolizumab ­(Keytruda) estimates that one-quarter of appropriately selected patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) may attain long-term survival.

” ‘In the context of the pembrolizumab program, these are the furthest-out data that we have so far, and I think they represent a remarkable step forward,’ commented Matthew D. Hellmann, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, who presented the analysis at the 2017 ASCO-SITC (Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer) Clinical Immuno-Oncology Symposium.”

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Pembrolizumab Long-Term Survival Rate Could Reach 25% in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with pembrolizumab (Keytruda) could elicit long-term survival (LTS) rates of 21% to 25% for previously-treated patients with PD-L1–positive non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) compared with 3% to 4% for docetaxel, according to a statistical analysis of findings from the KEYNOTE-010 and -001 trials presented at the 2017 ASCO-SITC Symposium.

“Findings from the analysis shed light on the number of patients with advanced NSCLC expected to benefit for up to 70 months from pembrolizumab. According to survival statistics from the SEER database for 2006 to 2012, the 5-year survival rate was 4.3% for those with lung or bronchus cancer with distant metastases.”

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Long-Term Survival Achieved in Metastatic Melanoma With Personalized Vaccine

Excerpt:

“Two patients with melanoma that had spread to the liver survived for at least 8.5 and 12 years after resection of the hepatic tumor and treatment with patient-specific immunotherapeutic vaccines. The vaccines, designed to activate the immune system against the tumor, were derived from the patients’ own dendritic cells loaded with proteins isolated from their tumors, as described in an article published in Cancer Biotherapy and Radiopharmaceuticals.

“Robert O. Dillman, MD, formerly Vice President Oncology, Caladrius Biosciences, Inc. and currently Chief Medical Officer, NeoStem Oncology (Irvine, CA) and Executive Medical and Scientific Director, Hoag Cancer Institute (Newport Beach, CA) discusses the typically poor prognosis for patients with melanoma of the eye or skin that spreads to the liver, and reports on the potential to achieve long-term survival without disease progression in a subset of patients using the eltrapuldencel-T vaccine. One patient had no disease progression for more than 4.5 years, while the other patient survived and remained disease-free for more than 12 years.”

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Immunotherapy Drug Doubles Long-Term Survival Rate For Melanoma Patients

Excerpt:

“Opdivo is a checkpoint inhibitor, which releases the break on the immune system allowing a patient’s body to fight the cancer. Research released on Sunday shows that patients who received the drug had a 34 percent survival rate 5 years out. A similar immunotherapy drug, Keytruda, was part of Jimmy Carter’s successful treatment for advanced melanoma.”

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ACOG: Vaginal Estrogen Safe for Breast Ca Survivors

“Vaginal estrogen is safe for breast cancer survivors suffering from such urogenital symptoms as vaginal atrophy, vasomotor symptoms, and lower urinary tract infections, and there is no evidence of increased risk of cancer recurrence with the treatment, according to a statement from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG).

“However, the decision to use vaginal estrogen should be made in consultation with a woman’s oncologist, and only if ‘first-line choices’ for managing urogenital symptoms — which should be nonhormonal products such as lubricants — are ineffective for breast cancer patients, reported ACOG’s Committee on Gynecologic Practice, writing in Obstetrics and Gynecology.

“Sexual medicine specialist Lauren Streicher, MD, of Northwestern University, who was not involved with the statement, said that although the treatment clearly eases vaginal dryness, many physicians are reluctant to prescribe it for breast cancer patients. But she said the response is quite different when gynecologists are asked about it.”


Long-Term Survival Possible With MAPK Inhibition in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

“Long-term outcomes for BRAF-mutant melanoma patients treated with BRAF and MEK inhibitors are influenced by a number of baseline factors including BRAF genotype, gender, and serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, according to a new study.

“Treatment of V600 BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma has improved with inhibition of the MAPK pathway with BRAF inhibitors and MEK inhibitors. But ‘the degree of response and the duration of survival are highly variable,’ wrote study authors led by Alexander M. Menzies, MBBS, of the Melanoma Institute Australia in Sydney. ‘Whether clinicopathologic factors can be used to predict the clinical course of these patients is largely unknown, and there have been few studies examining this issue.’

“The study included 142 consecutive immunotherapy- and MAPK inhibitor–naive patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic melanoma. All were treated either with BRAF inhibitors (111 patients) or with a combination of dabrafenib and trametinib (31 patients), and the median follow-up was 15.7 months. Results were published online ahead of print in Cancer.”


Ipilimumab Confers Long-Term Survival in Advanced Melanoma

“Ipilimumab was associated with long-term OS rates that plateaued after 3 years in patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma, according to results from a pooled analysis of phase 2 and phase 3 trials.

“ ‘We observed an apparent plateau in the survival curve regardless of prior therapy, ipilimumab dose or treatment regimen,’ Dirk Schadendorf, MD, of the department of dermatology at the University Hospital Essen, Germany, and colleagues wrote. ‘In all analyses, including those with OS data from patients in the expanded access treatment protocol, the survival curves seemed to consistently begin around year 3 and extended up to 10 years in some patients.’

“Schadendorf and colleagues sought to provide an estimate of the long-term OS benefit associated with ipilimumab (Yervoy, Bristol-Myers Squibb), which was approved in 2011 for the treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

“Researchers evaluated data from 1,861 patients with advanced melanoma who were enrolled in 10 prospective and two retrospective clinical trials. Approximately two-thirds (n = 1,257) of the patients had received prior treatment.”


Anxiety, Chronic Pain among Problems That Adult Cancer Survivors Experience Years after Treatment, New Study Finds

“A team of researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington and the University of Central Florida have determined that years after going into remission, many adult cancer survivors still encounter challenges arising from their disease and its treatment.

“From anxiety about a cancer recurrence to physical problems such as chronic pain, survivors aren’t quite done battling the effects of cancer even 2, 5, and 10 years after treatment for the disease.

“The study, ‘Current unmet needs of cancer survivors: Analysis of open-ended responses to the American Cancer Society Study of Cancer Survivors II,’ is published online and in the February issue of Cancer, a journal of the American Cancer Society.

” ‘So often, the expectation is that a cancer survivor should be grateful for having survived a diagnosis of cancer. And while this may be true, those survivors with debilitating, lingering effects of cancer and its treatment are not always acknowledged within healthcare systems as needing continued care based on their cancer survivor status,’ said Gail Adorno, assistant professor in the UT Arlington School of Social Work and co-principal investigator on the study.”