Radiotherapy Halves Deaths From Prostate Cancer 15 Years After Diagnosis

Excerpt:

“A longitudinal Nordic study, comparing the results of hormone (antiandrogen) therapy with or without the addition of local radiotherapy, shows that a combination of treatments halves the risk of death from prostate cancer 15 years after diagnosis. This according to a follow-up study recently published in the journal European Urology.

” ‘Before the turn of the century, it was tradition to castrate men with high-risk or aggressive local  with no signs of spreading, as the disease at that point was thought to be incurable,’ says Anders Widmark, senior physician and professor at Umeå University, who led the study.”

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