Clinical Trial Looks at Targeted Genetic Therapies for Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are enrolling patients in a clinical trial looking at targeted gene therapies in patients with early stage lung cancer who have had surgery.

“This could help researchers gain insight into genetic targets that could aid in earlier intervention and better outcomes for patients.

” ‘Despite therapeutic advances in recent years, cancer remains the second leading cause of death in the United States, and effective new therapies are still desperately needed. Additionally, lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths for women and for men,’ says Sandra Starnes, MD, Dr. John B. Flege Jr. Chair in Cardiothoracic Surgery, associate professor of surgery and co-director of the UC Cancer Institute’s Comprehensive Lung Cancer Center. ‘Targeted genetic therapy holds great promise for improved efficacy in treating patients. In this trial, researchers will evaluate the use of a newer targeted therapy for early stage who have had surgery and completed post-operative chemotherapy.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Radiation Prior to Immune Checkpoint Inhibitor Therapy May Lower Toxicity

Excerpt:

“Ten percent of patients with lung cancer who received thoracic radiation therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors experienced severe toxicities, according to a retrospective study presented at the Multidisciplinary Thoracic Cancers Symposium.

“However, none of the patients who received radiation therapy before immune checkpoint inhibitors experienced severe toxicities.

” ‘Treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors and thoracic radiation therapy carried a modest risk for side effects,” Kamran A. Ahmed, MD, a resident in radiation oncology at Moffitt Cancer Center, said during a press conference. ‘Our study indicates the risk for thoracic radiation therapy– and immune checkpoint inhibitor–related pneumonitis may be highest when thoracic radiation therapy is delivered after immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Pembrolizumab Shows Promise in Treatment of Mesothelioma

Excerpt:

“Pembrolizumab, an antibody drug already used to treat other forms of cancer, can be effective in the treatment of the most common form of mesothelioma, according to a new study led by investigators from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, published this month in The Lancet Oncology, is the first to show a positive impact from checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy drugs on this disease.

“Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare and aggressive cancer that represents about 90 percent of all malignant mesothelioma cases. It’s primarily caused by the inhalation of asbestos, a fiber commonly found in some forms of insulation, vinyl floor tiles, and other material. Tumors form in the pleura, a thin membrane of cells that line the lungs and chest wall. Most survive less than a year. This poor prognosis is partially due to the fact that most patients are not diagnosed until they are already at a late stage of the disease. The standard first-line therapy treatment involves chemotherapy, and currently there is no approved second-line therapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Leading Cancer Organizations: Trump’s Proposed NIH Budget Cuts Will Threaten Research, Patient Care

Excerpt:

“Many of the nation’s leading research organizations and cancer centers have voiced their opposition to President Donald Trump’s proposed budget, which includes a $5.8 billion cut to NIH funding in 2018.

“The budget ‘blueprint’ — released Thursday — proposes $54 billion in cuts overall, including a 16.2% decrease, or $12.6 billion, for the Department of Health and Human Services.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


ASCO Statement: President’s Budget Will Devastate U.S. Research Enterprise

Excerpt:

“ASCO President Daniel F. Hayes, MD, FACP, FASCO, released the following statement today:

” ‘We soundly oppose President Trump’s budget outline, which would cut $6 billion from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Reducing NIH’s funding by nearly 20% will devastate our nation’s already-fragile federal research infrastructure and undercut a longstanding commitment to biomedical science that has fueled advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, and treatment.

” ‘When we are on the cusp of tremendous advances in cancer care, the United States can’t turn back the clock on research that will benefit millions of Americans with life-threatening diseases and their families. Gutting the U.S. research infrastructure won’t make America First, but will decidedly place the United States behind other countries in scientific advances. Failure to nurture the historic U.S. investment in research places health outcomes, scientific leadership, and economic growth at risk.’ ”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


AACR Strongly Opposes the Draconian Cuts to Medical Research Proposed in President Trump’s FY 2018 Budget

Excerpt:

“On behalf of the entire cancer research community, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) was shocked to learn that the Trump administration is proposing to cut $5.8 billion from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) budget in fiscal year (FY) 2018.  At a time when extraordinary progress is being made against cancer and many other diseases, these draconian cuts would set research back for decades and also threaten the careers of an entire generation of young investigators working in labs and clinics all over the country who are committed to improving public health and saving lives.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Combination of Radiation and Immune Checkpoint Therapy Holds Potential for Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“An emerging approach for cancer treatment seeks to combine radiation therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICPIs) to more effectively control tumors in the chest with an acceptable risk of severe treatment-related side effects. Ten percent of patients in a retrospective analysis of metastatic lung cancer experienced severe toxicity as a result of the combination therapy. Findings will be presented tomorrow at the 2017 Multidisciplinary Thoracic Cancers Symposium.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Updated Data on SBRT Radiation for NSCLC Lung Cancer Confirm Benefits of ‘One and Done’ Approach

Excerpt:

“New research led by a radiation oncologist at Roswell Park Cancer Institute indicates that less may be more when it comes to some forms of radiation therapy for cancer. In a presentation highlighted in a plenary session today at the Multidisciplinary Thoracic Cancers Symposium in San Francisco, California, Anurag Singh, MD, shared updated evidence that patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) as treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) benefit as much from a single fraction, or dose, of radiation as they would from the standard three-dose treatment schedule — and with significant advantages in terms of convenience for patients and caregivers.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Genetic Profile of Treatment-Resistant Lung Cancer More Variable Than Previously Understood

Excerpt:

“The genetic mutations underlying treatment resistance in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are more complex and dynamic than previously thought. Analysis of 355 biopsied tumors from patients who acquired resistance to EGFR inhibitors, the most common form of targeted therapy for NSCLC, found that mutations frequently varied between biopsies and that nearly one in five patients harbored more than one type of genetic resistance to treatment. Findings will be presented today at the 2017 Multidisciplinary Thoracic Cancers Symposium.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.