PARP Inhibitor Improves Overall Response Rates in Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

In a randomized, Phase II trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, adding the PARP inhibitor veliparib to a standard chemotherapy agent improved overall response rates (ORR) in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Researchers also identified a select group of patients—those whose tumors expressed SLFN11— who also saw a progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) benefit, suggesting a promising biomarker for the PARP-inhibitor sensitivity in SCLC.

“The study was published in Journal of Clinical Oncology. Ongoing follow-up studies are underway to confirm the results, which could result in the first new therapeutic option for this rare and aggressive lung cancer in more than three decades, said Lauren Averett Byers, M.D., associate professor of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology.”

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PFS Extended With Addition of Bevacizumab to Erlotinib in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Upfront treatment with the combination of bevacizumab (Avastin) and erlotinib (Tarceva) is superior to erlotinib alone as for patients with non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations, according to results of a preplanned interim analysis of the phase III study known as NEJ026.

“The analysis showed a median progression-free survival (PFS) by independent review (the primary endpoint) of 16.9 months with the bevacizumab/erlotinib combination compared with 13.3 months with erlotinib by itself, said Naoki Furuya, MD, PhD, at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.”

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Nivolumab Plus Low-Dose Ipilimumab Shows Durable Responses for PD-L1-Negative, TMB-High NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of nivolumab (Opdivo) and low-dose ipilimumab (Yervoy) reduced the risk of progression or death by 52% compared with standard platinum doublet chemotherapy for patients with metastatic PD-L1–negative, tumor mutation burden (TMB)-high non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to findings from the phase III CheckMate 227 trial presented at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.

“In the PD-L1–negative (<1% expression), TMB-high (≥10 mutations/megabase) subgroup, regardless of histology, median progression-free survival (PFS) with nivolumab/ipilimumab was 7.7 months compared with 5.3 months for chemotherapy and 6.2 months for nivolumab and chemotherapy. The 1-year PFS rate was 45% with nivolumab/ipilimumab compared with 27% for nivolumab/chemotherapy and just 8% for chemotherapy.”

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Adding Bevacizumab to Erlotinib Prolongs PFS in EGFR-Mutated NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The combination of bevacizumab (Avastin) and erlotinib (Tarceva) is superior to erlotinib alone as upfront treatment for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. A preplanned interim analysis of the phase III study known as NEJ026 showed a median progression-free survival (PFS) by independent review (the primary endpoint) of 16.9 months with the bevacizumab/erlotinib combination compared with 13.3 months with erlotinib by itself, said Naoki Furuya, MD, PhD, at the 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting.”

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ALEX Trial Results Show Alectinib Further Outpacing Crizotinib in ALK+ NSCLC

Excerpt:

Updated results of the global phase III ALEX trial comparing alectinib with crizotinib as first-line treatment against ALK-positive non-small cell lung cancer show a median progression-free survival (PFS) of 34.8 months in 152 patients treated with alectinib versus 10.9 months in 151 patients treated with crizotinib.

” ‘Think of it like a horse race, only it’s not about who crosses the finish line first, but how far the horses can run,’ says D. Ross Camidge, MD, Ph.D., the Joyce Zeff Chair in Lung Cancer Research at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, director of Thoracic Oncology at the CU School of Medicine, and the study’s first author. ‘In this trial, it’s as if half of the people “riding” crizotinib had exhausted their horses at about 11 months. For patients on alectinib, when this trial first started reporting data last year, more than half were still on their horses, still running. Now enough time has elapsed to estimate the median performance of these alectinib ‘horses’ more accurately.’ ”

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Keytruda Alone Bests Chemo in Advanced NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated with pembrolizumab (Keytruda) had a greater median survival than patients treated with standard chemotherapy, even if the former had low levels of PD-L1, researchers reported here.

“Depending on the percentage of PD-L1 expression in the tumor, survival was between 4 and 8 months longer for patients treated with immunotherapy alone versus those treated with chemotherapy, according to Gilberto Lopes, MD, MBA, of the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami, and colleagues.”

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Six Tips to Spot Cancer ‘Fake News’

Excerpt:

Cancer is a popular topic for the media, as people care and worry about it in equal measure.

“News reports help people find out what researchers are working on, and how charitable donations are being spent. They also helps generate interest in the amazing science going on. But perhaps most of all, health stories and clinical trial results have a direct impact on people, raising interest in the latest discoveries further.

“And when it comes to , the emotion that’s tied to the subject means that scientific results must be discussed in a measured and accurate way. And most of the time that’s exactly what happens.”

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High Major Pathologic Response With Neoadjuvant Nivolumab in Resectable NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Immunotherapies targeting PD-1 and PD-L1 have become standards-of-care across all lines of therapy for patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who do not have targetable driver mutations. Furthermore, the PD-L1 inhibitor durvalumab was recently approved as consolidation therapy after chemoradiation in locally advanced NSCLC.  Based on the improved outcomes seen with these agents in advanced NSCLC, they are now being evaluated in early stage NSCLC where effective therapies are needed, as many patients (particularly those beyond stage IB) relapse after surgery, despite neoadjuvant/adjuvant chemotherapy.”

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Atezolizumab Plus Carboplatin/Nab-Paclitaxel Improves OS in Frontline NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Adding atezolizumab (Tecentriq) to nab-paclitaxel (Abraxane) and carboplatin in the frontline setting significantly improved overall survival (OS) in patients with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to findings from the phase III IMpower130 study.

“Atezolizumab also improved progression-free survival (PFS), the coprimary endpoint of the IMpower130 study, according to Genentech (Roche), the manufacturer of the PD-L1 inhibitor. The company plans to share the study data at an upcoming oncology meeting.”

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