Investigational CDK4/6 Inhibitor Abemaciclib is Active Against a Range of Cancer Types

Excerpt:

“The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast cancer, non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), glioblastoma, and melanoma, according to results from a phase I clinical trial published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

“The results of the trial supported the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decision to grant breakthrough therapy designation to abemaciclib (previously known as LY2835219) for patients with refractory hormone receptor–positive advanced or metastatic breast cancer, according to one of the senior authors of the study, Amita Patnaik, MD, associate director of clinical research at South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics in San Antonio, Texas.”

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Possible Treatment on Horizon for Advanced KRAS-Mutant NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Promising early phase clinical trials have led to the initiation of the phase III JUNIPER trial, which is assessing abemaciclib (LY2835219) for patients with previously treated KRAS-mutant lung cancer, a traditionally hard to treat genetic subtype.

“JUNIPER is an open label phase III study currently recruiting patients with stage IV non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with a detectable KRAS mutation who have progressed following treatment with platinum-based chemotherapy (NCT02152631). Patients will be randomized to receive either abemaciclib or erlotinib, both with best supportive care.

“ ‘KRAS mutations are common in patients with NSCLC, but there have been few clinical advances in our treatment for these patients,’ said investigator Jonathan W. Goldman, MD, of the Department of Medicine, Hematology/Oncology, member of the Signal Transduction and Therapeutics Program Area at UCLA’s Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, who explored the drug in a phase I trial.”

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AACR: LY2835219 Promising for Metastatic Breast Cancer

“The novel cell cycle inhibitor selective for the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 (CDK4/6), LY2835219, shows promise for metastatic breast cancer, according to a study presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research, held from April 5 to 9 in San Diego.

“Amita Patnaik, M.D., from South Texas Accelerated Research Therapeutics in San Antonio, and colleagues conducted a phase I study with expansion cohorts to assess the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor activity of LY2835219 in five tumor types. LY2835219 was administered to the expansion cohorts (132 patients) every 12 hours on days one to 28 of a 28-day cycle.”

Editor’s note: LY2835219 is a new drug that shows promise for treating metastatic breast cancer.