Astra and Merck Win Speedy Review for Lynparza in Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“U.S. regulators have granted a priority review to AstraZeneca’s ovarian cancer drug Lynparza as a treatment for breast cancer, putting it on track for potential approval in the new disease area during the first quarter of 2018.

“The medicine, which is being jointly developed and marketed with Merck under a deal struck in July, is the first poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) drug to be considered for use outside ovarian cancer.”

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AstraZeneca’s Lynparza Slows Spread of Inherited Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

AstraZeneca Plc showed that its drug Lynparza slowed progression of a devastating, inherited form of breast cancer that typically strikes younger women, potentially opening up a new market for a pill originally approved to treat ovarian tumors.

“A study of 302 women, dubbed OlympiAD, found that those getting the drug were 42 percent less likely to see their cancer spread than those given conventional chemotherapy, according to results presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago. Women taking Lynparza had their disease progress after about seven months, compared with 4.2 months of median progression-free survival for those on chemotherapy.”

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Lynparza Meets Primary Endpoint in Phase III Trial in BRCA-Mutated Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“AstraZeneca today announced positive results from its Phase III OLYMPIAD trial comparing Lynparza (olaparib) tablets (300mg twice daily) to physician’s choice of a standard of care chemotherapy in the treatment of patients with HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer harbouring germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. Patients treated with Lynparza showed a statistically-significant and clinically-meaningful improvement in progression-free survival (PFS) compared with those who received chemotherapy (capecitabine, vinorelbine or eribulin).”

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FDA Grants Olaparib Breakthrough Designation in mCRPC

“Olaparib (Lynparza) has received an FDA breakthrough therapy designation as a treatment for patients with BRCA1/2 or ATM-mutated metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) in those who have received a prior taxane-based chemotherapy and at least either hormonal agent enzalutamide (Xtandi) or abiraterone acetate (Zytiga).

“The designation, which will accelerate the development and review of the first-in-class oral PARP inhibitor, is based on data from the phase II TOPARP-A trial that demonstrated that olaparib monotherapy had an overall response rate (ORR) of nearly 90% in a biomarker-defined subgroup of patients who had DNA-repair defects.


Finally: An Active Prostate Cancer Drug That Doesn’t Target Androgen


Most of the recent developments in prostate cancer treatment have addressed the timing and duration of androgen deprivation, who should receive radiation treatments, and the timing of the few available chemotherapy options. But this month’s big news is a welcome change: metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancers (mCRPCs) that harbor mutations in BRCA2 or one of a few other genes have a remarkable response to olaparib (Lynparza), a drug that inhibits the enzyme PARP1. Continue reading…


Novel Olaparib Combination Shows Activity in Ovarian, Breast Cancers

“A combination treatment composed of the PARP inhibitor olaparib and the investigational PI3K inhibitor BKM120 demonstrated activity and safety for women with triple-negative breast cancer or high-grade serous ovarian cancer, according to study findings presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting.

“High-grade serous ovarian cancer and triple-negative breast cancer are similar in that they often have germline BRCA mutations, have a sensitivity to platinum agents and have high copy number alterations based on The Cancer Genome Atlas, according to study background. Further, preclinical data have suggested olaparib (Lynparza, AstraZeneca) is synergistic with BKM120 (Novartis) and BYL719 (Novartis) in both cancers.

“Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, medical director of gynecologic oncology at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and associate professor of medicine at Harvard University Medical School, and colleagues evaluated olaparib plus BKM120 in 12 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and 34 patients with high-grade serous ovarian cancer. Thirty-five patients had germline BRCA mutations.

“ ‘This is one area where we in ovarian cancer are in the forefront,’ Matulonis said during a press conference. ‘We are using an FDA-approved biomarker through germline BRCA status to basically say when a patient is eligible to receive olaparib.’ “


Trial Shows Benefit of 'BRCA-Targeting' Drug in Prostate Cancer

“Men with prostate cancer benefit from treatment with the pioneering drug olaparib – the first cancer drug to target inherited mutations – according to the results of a major trial presented today (Tuesday).

“Olaparib was licensed in December for women with ovarian cancer and inherited BRCA mutations, but the new research suggests it could also benefit men with genomic faults within their tumours.

“Researchers told the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) conference in Philadelphia that up to 30 per cent of men with advanced prostate cancer had tumours with defects in repairing DNA – and these responded particularly well to olaparib.

“The men most likely to benefit could be identified by genetic testing to look for mutations in genes responsible for DNA repair – including the BRCA genes and the gene ATM.”