Double Mastectomy to Prevent Breast Cancer Reduces Risk of Dying from the Disease in BRCA1 Mutation Carriers – but Does Not Reduce Further the Already Low Risk in BRCA2 Carriers

Excerpt:

“Healthy women who carry a breast cancer-­causing mutation in the BRCA1 gene, not only reduce their risk of developing the disease but also their chances of dying from it if they have both breasts removed, according to new research presented today (Wednesday) at the 11th European Breast Cancer Conference.

“However, the study also found that for women with a mutation in the BRCA2 gene, there was no difference in their chances of dying from the disease whether they opted to have their breasts removed (bilateral risk-­reducing mastectomy or BRRM) or chose to have closer surveillance instead.”

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FAQs After Diagnosis: Early Stage Hormone-Positive Breast Cancer


This post is written by ASK Cancer Commons Scientist and Product Team Member Amanda Nottke, PhD. Dr. Nottke regularly provides guidance to patients through our ASK Cancer Commons service.

After a diagnosis of early stage, hormone-positive breast cancer, you may find yourself facing several daunting decisions, such as choosing between the extensive surgery of mastectomy versus a more minor lumpectomy procedure paired with radiation (with all its challenging side effects). And once surgery is complete, what next? Hormone therapy is clearly indicated for many women, but which drug, and how long to take it? And what about chemo—how to know if the tough side effects are worth the possible reduction in risk of recurrence?

Fortunately, there are a wealth of quality datasets available to inform these decisions. Below are some of the questions we get most frequently from patients using our ASK Cancer Commons service, answered according to the latest thinking from scientific literature and our expert physician network. If you are facing your own cancer treatment decisions and would like free one-one-one expert support, please submit your case here.

1. If my doctor has said either mastectomy or lumpectomy plus radiation are appropriate for me, how do I choose?

Many studies have looked at this, and overall the outcomes for mastectomy versus lumpectomy plus radiation are extremely similar (both are effective treatments, so you can instead weigh the side effects of radiation versus the more intensive surgery of the mastectomy). This webpage provides a helpful summary of the pros and cons of mastectomy compared to lumpectomy. Continue reading…


How Decision-Making Habits Influence the Breast Cancer Treatments Women Consider

Excerpt:

“A new study finds that more than half of women with early stage breast cancer considered an aggressive type of surgery to remove both breasts. The way women generally approach big decisions, combined with their values, impacts what breast cancer treatment they consider, the study also found.

“Contralateral prophylactic  – a procedure to remove both breasts when  occurs in only one breast – has become increasingly popular in recent years, with more than 20 percent of  opting for it. For most women, removing the unaffected breast does not improve survival.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Anti-Inflammatory, Anti-Stress Drugs Taken Before Surgery May Reduce Metastatic Recurrence

Excerpt:

“Most cancer-related deaths are the result of post-surgical metastatic recurrence. In metastasis, cells of primary tumors travel to other parts of the body, where they often proliferate into inoperable, ultimately fatal growths.

“A new Tel Aviv University study finds that a specific drug regimen administered prior to and after surgery significantly reduces the risk of post-surgical cancer recurrence. These medications, a combination of a beta blocker (which relieves stress and high blood pressure) and an anti-inflammatory, may also improve the long-term survival rates of patients. The treatment is safe, inexpensive—two medications similar in price to aspirin—and easily administered to patients without contraindications.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Post-Mastectomy Fat Grafting Boosts Patient-Reported Outcomes

Excerpt:

“Women with breast cancer who undergo autologous fat grafting following post-mastectomy breast reconstruction want a breast that looks and feels more natural and say it makes life better psychologically, emotionally, and sexually, according to researchers.

“Results from the ongoing Mastectomy Reconstruction Outcomes Consortium (MROC) study now show that fat grafting is effective and safe and that it does not increase risk for breast cancer recurrence or intervene with breast cancer screening.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


More Women With Breast Cancer Opt to Remove Healthy Breast

Excerpt:

“One in three breast cancer patients under 45 removed the healthy breast along with the breast affected by cancer in 2012, a sharp increase from the one in 10 younger women with breast cancer who had double mastectomies eight years earlier, a new study reports.

“The rate is especially high in some parts of the country, the study in JAMA Surgery found. Nearly half of younger women in five neighboring states — Nebraska, Missouri, Colorado, Iowa and South Dakota — had double mastectomies in 2010-12. Women often remove the healthy breast so they don’t have to worry about developing another cancer, even though there is no evidence that removing the healthy breast extends lives.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Breast Conserving Surgery Plus RT Better Than Mastectomy in Some Patients

Excerpt:

“A large registry study found that certain breast cancer patients gain a significant survival benefit with breast conserving surgery plus radiation therapy (BCT) compared with mastectomy. This includes patients over the age of 50 with T1–2N0–1 disease, and other factors.

“Studies comparing those options have often excluded elderly patients, or those with existing comorbidities. The new study involved two time cohorts from a Netherlands registry, one with 55,802 patients diagnosed between 1999 and 2005, and another with 65,394 patients diagnosed between 2006 and 2012. The results were presented by Mirelle Lagendijk, MD, of the Erasmus MC Cancer Institute in Rotterdam, at the European Cancer Congress 2017 in Amsterdam.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Some Early Breast Cancer Patients Benefit More from Breast Conservation Than from Mastectomy

Excerpt:

“Breast conserving therapy (BCT, breast conserving surgery combined with radiation therapy) is superior to mastectomy in certain types of breast cancer patients, according to results from the largest study to date, to be presented to the European Cancer Congress 2017 today (Monday).

“Professor Sabine Siesling, from the Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Organisation (IKNL) and University of Twente and Mirelle Lagendijk, MD, from the Department of Surgical Oncology, Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Rotterdam, The Netherlands, and colleagues from other hospitals, studied survival nationwide in nearly 130,000 , divided into two groups: those diagnosed between 1999-2005 and those diagnosed between 2006-2012. The patients selected from the Netherlands Cancer Registry had no metastases (spread of the cancer to organs other than the lymph nodes close to the tumour). To obtain information on cause of death, data were linked to the cause of death register.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


After Mastectomies, an Unexpected Blow: Numb New Breasts

Excerpt:

“After learning she had a high genetic risk for breast cancer, Dane’e McCree, like a growing number of women, decided to have her breasts removed. Her doctor assured her that reconstructive surgery would spare her nipples and leave her with natural-looking breasts.

“It did. But while Ms. McCree’s rebuilt chest may resemble natural breasts, it is now completely numb. Her nipples lack any feeling. She cannot sense the slightest touch of her breasts, perceive warmth or cold, feel an itch if she has a rash or pain if she bangs into a door.”

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If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.