Study Finds Ribociclib Improves Progression-Free Survival for Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, ribociclib, in combination with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole, dramatically improved progression-free survival (PFS) of post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, compared to the hormone therapy alone.

“The study found a 44 percent improvement in PFS with ribociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, and letrozole as a front line therapy. Gabriel Hortobagyi, M.D., professor of Breast Medical Oncology, presented the findings at ESMO 2016 Congress, and is the corresponding author of the New England Journal of Medicine paper.”

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Encouraging Results For Ribociclib In Advanced Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“At the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress this week, investigators presented data for a new and potentially important drug, ribociclib (Novartis). This oral medication is clearly active in hormone receptor-positive (ER+ or PR+) breast cancer. The findings of the MONALEESA trial were published in the NEJM.

“The main result is that for the most common form of advanced breast cancer, adding ribociclib to letrozole significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS), as compared to adding a placebo. After a year and a half (18 months) in this randomized, controlled clinical trial, PFS among women receiving ribociclib was 63.0%, vs. 42.2% in the placebo arm. That’s a big difference, when you consider that 99% of the patients on the study have stage 4, metastatic breast cancer.”

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FDA Approves New Indication for FASLODEX® (Fulvestrant)

“AstraZeneca today announced that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a new indication expanding the use of FASLODEX® (fulvestrant) to include use in combination with palbociclib. The combination use is for the treatment of women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) advanced or metastatic breast cancer (MBC) whose cancer has progressed after endocrine therapy. FASLODEX has been approved since 2002 as a monotherapy for the treatment of postmenopausal women with HR+ MBC whose cancer has progressed following antiestrogen therapy.

“Estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer is the most common subtype of breast cancer and one of the key drivers of disease progression for this subtype is through the ER. Laboratory studies show that FASLODEX directly targets the ER by blocking and degrading the ER, helping to inhibit tumor growth.”


Eribulin Is as Good as Capecitabine in Metastatic Breast Cancer

The gist: In a recent clinical trial with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer patients, women who took the drug eribulin did just as well as women who took capecitabine.  The results were particularly strong for women with triple-negative breast cancer. All women in the trial had received previous treatment with anthracycline- or taxane-based chemotherapy. More research is planned to determine just how beneficial eribulin might be.

“An international research team, led by Dartmouth’s Peter A. Kaufman, MD, published findings in the Journal of Clinical Oncology demonstrating that, while not superior to capecitabine, eribulin is an active and well-tolerated therapy in women with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) receiving this therapy as a first, second, or third line chemotherapy regimen. Additionally, these patients had all been previously treated with both an anthracycline and a taxane in either the adjuvant or metastatic setting. This study is the first to address the use of eribulin early in the course of metastatic breast cancer, specifically either the first or second line setting.

” ‘Additionally, it is of great interest that subset analysis suggests that eribulin may be particularly active and effective in triple negative MBC, which is known to be an aggressive subset of breast cancer, and one associated unfortunately with a particularly poor prognosis overall,’ said Kaufman.

“Eribulin has been approved in numerous countries in the third line or latter setting for the treatment of MBC, and is increasingly widely used. It is the only chemotherapeutic agent shown to have a survival benefit for patients with MBC in the third line or latter chemotherapeutic setting. Given previous research findings, and now findings from this large international trial, there has been great interest from oncologists and other clinicians in the potential impact that eribulin might have earlier in the course of MBC.”