Metformin Use Does Not Increase Prostate Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Metformin use in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival in patients with diabetes and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Urology.

“Michelle J. Mayer, from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, and colleagues used data from several Ontario administrative health care databases to identify men (older than 65 years) diagnosed with metastatic castration-resistant cancer and treated with docetaxel. Patients were stratified into groups based on diabetes status and use of antidiabetic medications to assess the effect of use with docetaxel on survival.”

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Blood Test Instead of Biopsy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“There has been a lot of buzz recently about the use of ‘liquid biopsies’ and how these blood tests that show cancer may be able to replace the need for tissue biopsies.

“The latest study shows that such a test could be useful in metastatic prostate cancer, where the biopsy sample would need to be taken from bone, which is painful, risky, and expensive, says an expert.

“This study used the Guardant360 test and found that cell-free, circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) was detected in most patients (94%) with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).”

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Optimizing Treatment With Radium-223 for Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“As oncologists await future treatment advances in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), the key is to unleash the full potential of available therapies, Robert Dreicer, MD, asserted during the 2016 CFS Chemotherapy Foundation Symposium.

“One agent that oncologist are focused on optimizing, Dreicer said, is radium-223 (Xofigo). Optimal use of this treatment remains mostly unknown, with current efforts focusing on exploring the agent’s potential in combination regimens.

“For instance, a phase III trial is randomizing patients with bone predominant mCRPC to radium-223 plus abiraterone acetate (Zytiga) or abiraterone alone (NCT02043678). Additionally, a randomized phase IIa study is evaluating the efficacy and safety of radium-223 in combination with abiraterone or enzalutamide (Xtandi) in patients with mCRPC to investigate bone-scan response, radiological progression-free survival, overall survival, and skeletal events (NCT02034552).”

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Clovis Oncology and Strata Oncology Announce Collaboration to Accelerate Enrollment in Rucaparib Prostate Cancer Development Program

Excerpt:

“Clovis Oncology, Inc. (NASDAQ: CLVS) and Strata Oncology, Inc. today announced an agreement to accelerate patient identification and enrollment for Clovis’ ongoing TRITON (Trial of Rucaparib in Prostate Indications) clinical trial program, which includes Phase 2 and Phase 3 clinical trials of rucaparib in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, both of which are open for enrollment.

“Rucaparib is an oral inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP), approved in the U.S. in 2016 as Rubraca™ (rucaparib) as monotherapy for the treatment of patients with deleterious BRCA mutation (germline and/or somatic) associated advanced ovarian cancer, who have been treated with two or more chemotherapies, and selected for therapy by an FDA-approved companion diagnostic. Emerging data suggest PARP inhibition may also provide activity in the treatment of metastatic prostate cancers harboring deleterious mutations in BRCA1/2 and ATM or other human genes associated with DNA damage repair. These mutations may be germline (inherited) or somatic (acquired).”

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New Therapeutic Agent Proves More Effective Treatment for Advanced Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“A German multicenter study, initiated by the German Society of Nuclear Medicine, demonstrates that lutetium-177 (Lu-177)-labeled PSMA-617 is a promising new therapeutic agent for radioligand therapy (RLT) of patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). The study is published in the January 2017 issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine and is the featured article.

“Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is overexpressed in and even more so with castration-resistant disease. This makes development of new tracers for PSMA-targeted radionuclide therapies a promising treatment approach. Prostate cancer deaths are usually the result of mCRPC, and the median survival for men with mCRPC has been less than two years.”

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Cabazitaxel/Abiraterone Combination Promising in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“The combination of cabazitaxel and abiraterone was well tolerated and showed antitumor activity in previously treated patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), according to a new phase I/II study.

” ‘Therapeutic options for men with mCRPC have evolved considerably with the approval of five therapies associated with improved overall survival,’ wrote study authors led by Christophe Massard, MD, PhD, of Gustave Roussy Cancer Campus in Villejuif, France. Still, ‘there is a need to provide robust evidence on how these agents should be used, in sequence or in combination, to achieve optimal medical management.’ ”

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Adding Bone Drugs to Radium-223 May Enhance Benefit in mCRPC

Excerpt:

“Men with bone-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) appeared to derive additional benefits from treatment with radium-223 with concomitant bone-targeted therapies, according to data from an extended-access program.

“After a median follow-up of 7.5 months from initial injection of radium-223, patients on concomitant denosumab had yet to reach a median overall survival (OS), whereas patients treated with radium-223 alone had a median survival of 13.4 months.”

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Enzalutamide Shows Efficacy in Prostate Cancer With Visceral Mets

Excerpt:

“Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) and visceral metastases (liver and lung) fare better with the androgen receptor inhibitor enzalutamide than placebo, according to a new analysis from the phase III AFFIRM trial. There were differences in response based on which of those two sites had metastases, suggesting they should be considered differently for treatment.

” ‘Visceral metastases are identified in approximately 22% to 30% of patients with mCRPC and are associated with unfavorable outcomes,’ wrote study authors led by Yohann Loriot, MD, PhD, of Université Paris-Saclay in Villejuif, France.”

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Video: An Overview of the ALSYMPCA Study in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Excerpt:

“Luke Nordquist, MD, FACP, a urologic medical oncologist and CEO of the Urology Cancer Center and GU Research Network, gives an overview of the Alpharadin in Symptomatic Prostate Cancer Patients (ALSYMPCA) study, and he discusses ongoing trials examining the use of radium-223 dichloride (Xofigo) in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).”

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