First Drug that Treats Melanomas in the Eyes

About half of melanomas that start in the eye spread to other parts of the body, usually killing people within a year. But while there are a variety of therapies for melanomas in the skin, those in the eyes are biologically distinct and there has been no good way to treat them—until now. A clinical trial of 157 people showed that a drug called selumetinib can shrink melanomas of the eye, which form in a layer called uvea that includes the iris. Selumetinib is a MEK inhibitor that targets the most common uveal mutations (GNAQ and GNA11). The researchers found that tumors shrank in in half of those treated with selumetinib and did not grow again for twice as long compared to those treated with standard chemotherapy (an average of 16 vs 7 weeks). This work was presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology’s 2013 meeting.


Paradoxical Oncogenesis—The Long-Term Effects of BRAF Inhibition in Melanoma

The clinical benefits of BRAF inhibition in patients with advanced-stage BRAF-mutant melanoma are now well established. Although the emergence of cutaneous squamous-cell carcinomas (SCCs) and secondary melanomas in patients on BRAF-inhibitor therapy have been well described, reports are emerging of additional secondary premalignant and malignant events, including RAS-mutant leukaemia, the metastatic recurrence of RAS-mutant colorectal cancer and the development of gastric and colonic polyps.”


FDA Greenlights Two New Targeted Treatments for Melanoma

Good news for people with melanomas that have spread—the U.S. Food and Drug Administration just approved two new drugs that target tumors with common mutations. The drugs are dabrafenib (Tafinlar), a BRAF inhibitor, and trametinib (Mekinist), an MEK inhibitor. Developed by the pharmaceutical firm GlaxoSmithKline, both drugs target BRAF V600E mutations, which occur in about half of melanoma tumors. In addition, trametinib also targets V600K mutations, which are the next most common BRAF abnormalities. While these drugs have been tested in combination, using them together is not yet approved. The FDA also okayed a new test for the BRAF V600E mutation that is made by diagnostics firm bioMerieux.


Coordinate Direct Input of Both KRAS and IGF1 Receptor to Activation of PI3 kinase in KRAS-Mutant Lung Cancer

“Using a panel of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, we show here that MAP-ERK kinase (MEK) and RAF inhibitors are selectively toxic for the KRAS-mutant genotype, whereas phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, and mTOR inhibitors are not. IGF1 receptor (IGF1R) tyrosine kinase inhibitors also show selectivity for KRAS-mutant lung cancer lines.”


MEK Inhibition Affects STAT3 Signaling and Invasion in Human Melanoma Cell Lines

“Elevated activity of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade is found in the majority of human melanomas and is known to regulate proliferation, survival and invasion. Current targeted therapies focus on decreasing the activity of this pathway; however, we do not fully understand how these therapies impact tumor biology, especially given that melanoma is a heterogeneous disease. Using a three-dimensional (3D), collagen-embedded spheroid melanoma model, we observed that MEK and BRAF inhibitors can increase the invasive potential of ∼20% of human melanoma cell lines…”


Discovery of a Novel ERK Inhibitor with Activity in Models of Acquired Resistance to BRAF and MEK Inhibitors

The high frequency of activating RAS or BRAF mutations in cancer provides strong rationale for targeting the MAPK pathway. Selective BRAF and MEK inhibitors have shown clinical efficacy in melanoma patients. However, the majority of responses are transient and resistance is often associated with pathway reactivation of the ERK signaling pathway. Here we describe the identification and characterization of SCH772984, a novel and selective inhibitor of ERK1/2 which displays behaviors of both type I and type II kinase inhibitors…”


IQGAP1 Scaffold-Kinase Interaction Blockade Selectively Targets RAS-MAP Kinase–Driven Tumors

“Upregulation of the ERK1 and ERK2 (ERK1/2) MAP kinase (MAPK) cascade occurs in >30% of cancers1, often through mutational activation of receptor tyrosine kinases or other upstream genes, including KRAS and BRAF2. Efforts to target endogenous MAPKs are challenged by the fact that these kinases are required for viability in mammals34. Additionally, the effectiveness of new inhibitors of mutant BRAF has been diminished by acquired tumor resistance through selection for BRAF-independent mechanisms of ERK1/2 induction…”


New Drug Overcomes Resistance to BRAF Inhibitors in Mice and Cultured Human Cells

An experimental drug may strengthen treatments that target melanomas with mutations in the BRAF gene, reported researchers from the pharmaceutical company Merck at the American Association for Cancer Research’s 2013 meeting. Treatments that target BRAF often stop working because tumors activate a related protein called ERK, which is the target of Merck’s new drug. Called SCH772984, the drug inhibits ERK in cultured human tumor cells with BRAF, NRAS, or KRAS mutations; slows cell division in human tumor cells that resist treatments that target BRAF or MEK; and shrinks tumors in mice. The researchers have begun a phase I clinical trial of an ERK inhibitor in people with tumors.


Bilateral Multifocal Central Serous-Like Chorioretinopathy due to MEK Inhibition for Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma

Newer chemotherapeutic agents target extracellular signaling, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) pathway. We present a case of a 54-year-old female who developed bilateral multifocal central serous-like chorioretinopathy shortly after starting MEK inhibition for metastatic cutaneous melanoma…”