Biomarkers Discovered That May Help Predict Response to Drugs Targeting KRAS-mutated NSCLC

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Scientists have identified biomarkers that may help predict whether patients with KRAS-mutated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) will respond to concurrent treatment with an MEK inhibitor and a PI3 kinase inhibitor, a drug…


Bilateral Multifocal Central Serous-Like Chorioretinopathy due to MEK Inhibition for Metastatic Cutaneous Melanoma

Newer chemotherapeutic agents target extracellular signaling, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) pathway. We present a case of a 54-year-old female who developed bilateral multifocal central serous-like chorioretinopathy shortly after starting MEK inhibition for metastatic cutaneous melanoma…”


Melanoma adapts to RAF/MEK inhibitors through FOXD3-mediated upregulation of ERBB3

The mechanisms underlying adaptive resistance of melanoma to targeted therapies remain unclear. By combining ChIP sequencing with microarray-based gene profiling, we determined that ERBB3 is upregulated by FOXD3, a transcription factor that promotes resistance to RAF inhibitors in melanoma…”


Coordinate direct input of both KRAS and IGF1 receptor to activation of PI 3-kinase in KRAS mutant lung cancer

Using a panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, we show here that MEK and RAF inhibitors are selectively toxic for the KRAS mutant genotype, while PI 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT and mTOR inhibitors are not. Coordinate direct input of both KRAS and IGF1R is required to activate PI3K in KRAS mutant lung cancer cells.


Dabrafenib Bests Chemotherapy and May be Safer than Vemurafenib

A clinical trial found that dabrafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, was far more effective in treating melanomas that have BRAF mutations than the chemotherapy drug dacarbazine, according to a report at an American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting. Patients treated with this drug lived without getting worse for 70% longer than those treated with dacarbazine (5.1 vs. 2.7 months, respectively). Moreover, compared to those treated with vemurafenib in other studies, dabrafenib-treated patients had less risk of another kind of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma. This suggests that dabrafenib, which is experimental, could be safer than vemurafenib, which is FDA approved.


Ipilimumab Could Treat Small Melanomas in the Brain

A study in The Lancet shows that the drug ipilimumab could treat melanomas that have spread to the brain, particularly in people who do yet not have neurological symptoms. Of 51 such patients treated with ipilimumab, 12 had tumors in the brain that shrank or did not get worse and 14 had tumors outside the brain that shrank or did not get worse. Ipilimumab (Yervoy) is an immune system booster that the FDA has approved for treating advanced melanomas.

Primary source: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045%2812%2970090-6/abstract


Drug Targets Two Common Melanoma Mutations

An experimental drug could help control some melanomas that have BRAF or NRAS mutations, according to a report at an American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting. Tumors shrank or did not get worse in 8 out of 35 patients with the most common BRAF mutation (V600E), and in 6 out of 28 patients with NRAS mutations. This is the first targeted treatment for melanomas that have NRAS mutations. BRAF and NRAS mutations can activate a protein called MEK that is involved in cell division. The experimental drug, which is called MEK162, is a MEK inhibitor. The side effects of MEK162, which included diarrhea, rashes and swelling, were manageable.


Dabrafenib May Shrink Melanomas in the Brain

An early stage clinical trial suggests that dabrafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, could treat melanomas that have spread to the brain. The study, reported in The Lancet, included 10 people with brain metastases of melanomas that had BRAF mutations. Tumors shrank in 9 patients and were not evident in 4 patients. This is a surprise because the drug had not been expected to cross the blood-brain barrier effectively. Indeed, melanoma patients with brain metastases have been routinely excluded from previous trials of vemurafenib (Zelboraf) and other BRAF inhibitors.

Primary source: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045%2812%2970269-3/abstract


Vemurafenib Benefits People Previously Treated for Melanoma

A New England Journal of Medicine study found that vemurafenib, which was approved by the FDA in 2011, controlled melanomas in about half of people who had been previously treated for this disease. The trial included 132 repeat patients; tumors shrank in 47% of the patients and were not evident in 6% during the course of the trial. Vemurafenib is a BRAF inhibitor and about half of melanoma patients have BRAF mutations. While 26% of patients developed another kind of skin cancer called squamous cell carcinoma, these lesions were successfully removed surgically.

Primary source: http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1112302