The Trouble With KRAS


Mutations in the gene that encodes the KRAS protein are frequently encountered in various human cancers. They are found in about 30% of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), making KRAS the single most common gene mutated in this cancer. The rate of KRAS mutations in other cancers, such as pancreatic or colorectal, is even higher.

A mutant KRAS protein that is always in the “on” position activates many signaling pathways, many of which lead to unrestrained growth and proliferation of cancer cells. This makes KRAS an appealing treatment target. However, challenges abound, and researchers are exploring several different approaches to treating KRAS-mutant cancers.

Unlike mutations in proteins known as receptor tyrosine kinases, like EGFR or ALK, mutated KRAS is a very difficult protein to target with cancer drugs. (So much so that the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has undertaken a special effort to intensify the effort towards successful targeting of mutant KRAS, known as the RAS Initiative.) Continue reading…


European Commission Approves Mekinist for Metastatic Melanoma

“The European Commission has given marketing authorization for trametinib as monotherapy for unresectable or metastatic melanoma in adults with a BRAF V600 mutation, GlaxoSmithKline announced.

“Trametinib (Mekinist), a kinase inhibitor that targets MEK1/MEK2 activation and kinase activity, has not demonstrated clinical activity in patients who have progressed on a prior BRAF inhibitor therapy. Before taking trametinib, patients must have confirmation of a BRAF V600 mutation using a validated test.”

Editor’s note: The European Commission (the executive body of the European Union) has approved the drug trametinib (brand name Mekinist) as a treatment for unresectable or metastatic melanoma in adults whose tumors have a mutation called V600 in the BRAF gene. The approval is based on promising results for the drug in a clinical trial.


Selumetinib Plus Dacarbazine Versus Placebo Plus Dacarbazine as First-Line Treatment for BRAF-Mutant Metastatic Melanoma: A Phase 2 Double-Blind Randomised Study

“Patients with metastatic melanoma, 50% of whose tumours harbour a BRAF mutation, have a poor prognosis. Selumetinib, a MEK1/2 inhibitor, has shown antitumour activity in patients with BRAF-mutant melanoma and in preclinical models when combined with chemotherapy. This study was designed to look for a signal of improved efficacy by comparing the combination of selumetinib and dacarbazine with dacarbazine alone.”