Conference Abstract – MAP Kinase Pathway Alterations in BRAF-Mutant Melanoma Patients With Acquired Resistance to Combined RAF/MEK Inhibition

“Treatment of BRAF-mutant melanoma with combined dabrafenib and trametinib, which target RAF and the downstream MAP–ERK kinase (MEK)1 and MEK2 kinases, respectively, improves progression-free survival and response rates compared with dabrafenib monotherapy. Mechanisms of clinical resistance to combined RAF/MEK inhibition are unknown. This study represents an initial clinical genomic study of acquired resistance to combined RAF/MEK inhibition in BRAF-mutant melanoma, using WES and RNA-seq. The presence of diverse resistance mechanisms suggests that serial biopsies and genomic/molecular profiling at the time of resistance may ultimately improve the care of patients with resistant BRAF-mutant melanoma by specifying tailored targeted combinations to overcome specific resistance mechanisms.”

Editor’s note: We previously covered the benefits of a dabrafenib/trametinib combo for advanced-stage melanoma. However, some patients’ tumors become resistant to this drug combination and new treatment routes need to be considered. This study is exploring how molecular testing of specific genetic mutations in patients’ tumors might be used to help guide treatment decisions after they become resistant to the dabrafenib/trametinib combo.


Resistance to BRAF Inhibitors Is More Complicated Than Thought

Two new studies show that several different genetic mutations can make melanoma tumors resist drugs known as BRAF inhibitors, complicating treatment. These mutations are in genes that are part of the ‘MAPK pathway.’ The first study was on BRAF-inhibitor resistant melanomas from 45 people. In about half of the tumors, one of a set of three genes (MEK1, MEK2, MITF) was abnormal, and in three of the tumors more than one was abnormal.

The second study compared melanomas before and after resistance to combination treatment with both BRAF and MEK inhibitors. Tumors from three of the five people in the study developed genetic abnormalities that were not seen before treatment. On a positive note, when cells from resistant melanomas with both BRAF and MEK mutations were grown in the laboratory, they responded to a drug that inhibits a related protein called ERK.

The mutations in this study were all found in genes that code for proteins in the MAPK pathway, a particular group of proteins in a cell that work together to control cell multiplication that can lead to tumor growth. Knowing exactly which mutations a melanoma has will help doctors target it with the right combination of treatments.


Concurrent MEK2 Mutation and BRAF Amplification Confer Resistance to BRAF and MEK Inhibitors in Melanoma

“Although BRAF and MEK inhibitors have proven clinical benefits in melanoma, most patients develop resistance. We report a de novo MEK2-Q60P mutation and BRAF gain in a melanoma from a patient who progressed on the MEK inhibitor trametinib and did not respond to the BRAF inhibitor dabrafenib. We also identified the same MEK2-Q60P mutation along with BRAF amplification in a xenograft tumor derived from a second melanoma patient resistant to the combination of dabrafenib and trametinib. Melanoma cells chronically exposed to trametinib acquired concurrent MEK2-Q60P mutation and BRAF-V600E amplification, which conferred resistance to MEK and BRAF inhibitors. The resistant cells had sustained MAPK activation and persistent phosphorylation of S6K. A triple combination of dabrafenib, trametinib, and the PI3K/mTOR inhibitor GSK2126458 led to sustained tumor growth inhibition. Hence, concurrent genetic events that sustain MAPK signaling can underlie resistance to both BRAF and MEK inhibitors, requiring novel therapeutic strategies to overcome it.”