Targetable Mutations in NSCLC: More Testing Needed!


Diagnosis of adenocarcinoma of the lung, a major subtype of non-small lung cancer (NSCLC), nowadays triggers mandatory testing of tumor tissue for alterations in four genes: EGFR, ALK, ROS1, and more recently, BRAF. If present, these alterations predict sensitivity to specific targeted drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that work better and often longer than standard chemotherapy, and are better tolerated.

However, there are many more targetable/actionable genomic alterations (also known as “drivers”) in NSCLC. This blog post will briefly discuss most of them, with the goal of promoting molecular testing for more than the four “usual suspects” mentioned above. Some patients with these alterations may benefit from FDA-approved drugs or from enrollment in clinical trials that are testing additional drugs and drug combinations. Continue reading…


New Collaboration Leads to Combo Experimental Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

“Pharmaceutical companies are teaming up to combine experimental therapies that may help combat metastatic cutaneous and uveal melanomas in a whole new way. The novel international collaboration may bring new combined targeted therapies to the market much sooner.

“Eli Lilly and Immunocore Limited are collaborating in immunotherapy-based clinical trials to evaluate the utility of Immunocore’s lead T-cell receptor-based investigational drug IMCgp100. This agent will be combined with Lilly’s galunisertib (LY2157299) and merestinib (LY2801653) for melanoma treatment. The investigators will explore the durability and efficacy of potential combined regimens in patients with metastatic cutaneous and uveal melanomas.

“ ‘Combining our ImmTAC, IMCgp100 with Lilly’s galunisertib and merestinib has the potential to transform the treatment of metastatic cutaneous and uveal melanoma. Immunocore is committed to the development of IMCgp100 in metastatic uveal and cutaneous melanoma where there is such great unmet medical need,’ said Eliot Forster, who is chief executive officer of Immunocore, Oxford, England.”