CHMP Recommends EU Approval for Roche's Avastin in Combination With Tarceva for Patients With a Specific Type of Advanced Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) announced today that the European Union’s Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has issued a positive opinion for the use of Avastin® (bevacizumab) in combination with Tarceva® (erlotinib) for the first-line treatment of adult patients with unresectable advanced, metastatic or recurrent non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activating mutations. NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related death in Europe and across the world. Approximately 10-15 percent of Europeans with NSCLC will have tumours with EGFR-activating mutations, representing an estimated 33,000 cases in Europe per year or 90 every day.”

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Dabrafenib Active in BRAF-Mutant Metastatic NSCLC

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“Planchard et al found that the BRAF kinase inhibitor dabrafenib (Tafinlar) produced responses in previously treated and untreated patients with BRAF-mutant metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to a phase II trial reported in The Lancet Oncology. Activating BRAF V600E mutations are found in approximately 1% to 2% of lung adenocarcinomas.”

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Steroid Use With Abiraterone Offers Multidimensional Benefits to Patients With mCRPC

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“For decades, the standard of care for men with advanced prostate cancer has been the depletion or inhibition of androgens. While androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) often results in temporary tumor regression or symptom relief in some patients, disease progression ultimately occurs over time. For patients with metastatic disease, the median overall survival (OS), until very recently, had been less than 2 years after chemotherapy.

“While tumor progression with ADT was previously believed to be hormone-refractory or androgen-independent, a large body of evidence supports that metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) is commonly driven by elevated steroid synthesis, increased expression or splice variants of the androgen receptor (AR), or AR ligand promiscuity, indicating the ongoing need for targeted androgen therapies.”

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Neratinib Plus Paclitaxel vs. Trastuzumab Plus Paclitaxel in Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“While neratinib plus paclitaxel was not superior to trastuzumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for ERBB2-positive metastatic breast cancer in terms of progression-free survival, the combination was associated with delayed onset and reduced frequency of central nervous system metastases, a finding that requires a larger study to confirm, according to an article published online by JAMA Oncology.

“Metastatic ERBB2-positive breast cancer has a characteristic spread with most patients developing liver metastases and about half having poor prognosis with central nervous system involvement.

“Ahmad Awada, M.D., of the Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels, and coauthors conducted a randomized clinical trial to examine progression-free survival in women with recurrent or metastatic ERBB2-positive breast cancer. They also examined secondary outcomes that included time to symptomatic or progressive central nervous system lesions and safety.”

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TDM-1 With Docetaxel/Pertuzumab Offers Benefit in Advanced HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

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“Combining trastuzumab emtansine with docetaxel both with and without pertuzumab yielded promising efficacy in a phase Ib/IIa study of patients with HER2-positive locally advanced (LABC) or metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Many patients, however, required dose reductions due to toxicity.

“Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is a drug-antibody conjugate, and has been shown to offer significant survival benefits in phase III trials of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. ‘In preclinical studies, T-DM1 exhibited enhanced antitumor activity when combined with docetaxel or pertuzumab,’ wrote study authors led by Miguel Martin, MD, PhD, of Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón in Madrid.”

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EU Expands Nivolumab Approval for Lung and Kidney Cancer

Excerpt:

“The European Commission has approved new indications for the immunotherapy nivolumab (Opdivo, Bristol-Myers Squibb), expanding its use in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and adding the indication of renal cell carcinoma (RCC).

“The drug is already approved in Europe for use in previously treated patients with metastatic squamous NSCLC. Now the indication has been expanded to include non-squamous NSCLC, which represents 85% of the cases of lung cancer, and monotherapy in locally advanced or metastatic disease.

“Nivolumab is the only PD-1 inhibitor that has been approved for a broad range of patients with previously treated metastatic NSCLC, regardless of PD-L1 expression, and nivolumab is the only approved PD-1 inhibitor to demonstrate a better overall survival rate than docetaxel in previously treated metastatic NSCLC, the manufacturer pointed out in a press release.”

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Crizotinib Tops Chemo for ALK-Positive NSCLC With Brain Metastases

Excerpt:

“First-line crizotinib therapy offered better intracranial disease control rate (IC-DCR) than chemotherapy in patients with ALK-positive non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and stable treated brain metastases, according to results of a phase III study.

“Earlier results from the ongoing PROFILE 1014 trial showed that crizotinib offers better progression-free survival (PFS) and response rates compared with pemetrexed-platinum chemotherapy. ‘Although the development of targeted therapies has improved outcomes for selected patient populations with oncogenic driver mutations, brain metastases are frequent and result in significant morbidity and mortality in patients with lung cancer,’ wrote study authors led by Benjamin J. Solomon, MBBS, PhD, of the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in East Melbourne, Australia.”

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Bristol-Myers Squibb Receives Positive CHMP Opinion for Opdivo® (nivolumab) in Combination with Yervoy® (ipilimumab) for Treatment of Advanced Melanoma

Excerpt:

Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE: BMY) announced today that the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) has recommended the approval of Opdivo in combination with Yervoy for the treatment of advanced (unresectable or metastatic) melanoma in adults. The CHMP also added an informative statement to the broad indication that relative to Opdivo monotherapy, an increase in progression-free survival (PFS) for the combination of Opdivo with Yervoy is established only in patients with low tumor PD-L1 expression. This CHMP recommendation will now be reviewed by the European Commission (EC), which has the authority to approve medicines for the European Union. Opdivo monotherapy is already approved by the EC for advanced melanoma and previously treated advanced squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and was recommended for approval by the CHMP in February for previously treated advanced or metastatic non-squamous NSCLC and renal cell carcinoma (RCC).”

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TILs Advancing as Melanoma Immunotherapy Option

Excerpt:

“After nearly 30 years of research, tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) technology is being investigated as a means of producing personalized immunotherapy for patients with metastatic melanoma in a small clinical trial that may help open the door for broader application in other solid tumor types.

“The form of adoptive cell therapy, which utilizes TILs from the patient’s tumor, represents an intriguing way of overcoming the immunosuppressive power of cancer, according to Jeffrey S. Weber, MD, PhD. The melanoma expert provided an overview of the technology and its potential benefit in a lecture for oncologists and oncology professionals presented by Targeted Oncology, a division of MJH Associates, the publisher of OncologyLive, on February 19 in Miami Beach, Florida. Weber is the deputy director of the Laura and Isaac Perlmutter Cancer Center, co-director of its melanoma program, and head of Experimental Therapeutics at NYU Langone Medical Center.”

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