tnAcity Data Presented at SABCS Evaluates the Investigational Use of ABRAXANE® as First-Line Treatment of Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Celgene Corporation (CELG) today announced that the results of its randomized phase II tnAcity trial of ABRAXANE® for injectable suspension (paclitaxel protein-bound particles for injectable suspension) (albumin-bound) will be presented at the 2016 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS) December 6-10, 2016. The trial found that an investigational weekly combination regimen of ABRAXANE + carboplatin had significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) (7.4 months) compared to weekly regimens of either ABRAXANE + gemcitabine (5.4 months) or of carboplatin + gemcitabine (6.0 months) as first-line treatment of patients with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer (mTNBC).”

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A Breast Cancer Drug That Gets In The Brain? Cascadian Sees A Way Forward

Excerpt:

“Breast cancer patients sometimes end up dying when their tumors spread all the way to the brain. Some very good drugs already exist for patients with breast cancer, especially ones with tumors that overexpress the HER2 marker, but that success has raised a new question: Can drugmakers take another step, and fight those deadly brain metastases that get people in the end?

“Seattle-based Cascadian Therapeutics is testing that idea this week with researchers gathered at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. Cascadian is reporting today that patients who got conventional capecitabine and trastuzumab, plus an experimental small-molecule drug, tucatinib (aka ONT-380), lived a median of 7.8 months without their tumors getting worse. About 61% of patients on that triple-drug combo saw tumors shrink. It’s an impressive result, given that these patients were especially ill when they enrolled in the study, having already received a median of three prior rounds of HER2-targeted therapy. The data are also holding up over time: a snapshot of the data from June showed patients living a median of 6.3 months without their tumors spreading.”

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Super Patient: Honesty and Openness Help Lori Through the Holidays


When it comes to the holiday season, Lori Wallace, a mother of two sons, is accustomed to being in charge. “I’m the mom, I’m kind of the epicenter of my family,” she says. “So I make Christmas.”

But in early April of 2011, Lori woke up with pain in her breast from what she thought was a small toy left in her bed by her five-year-old. No toy was there, and the pain persisted. She soon had her diagnosis: stage IIA invasive ductal carcinoma. Continue reading…


Palbociclib Efficacious in Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Palbociclib can help slow the progression of advanced breast cancer, according to a study published in the Nov. 17 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

“Richard Finn, M.D., an assistant professor of medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, and colleagues tested palbociclib-letrozole as a first-line treatment for estrogen-receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative . They randomly assigned 666 women to receive the or letrozole alone, and followed them for up to three years.

“At that point, the researchers found that 43.7 percent of women in the palbociclib group had either died or seen their cancer progress. That compared with 61.7 percent of women on letrozole alone. Women on the drug combination typically remained progression-free for 24.8 months, versus 14.5 months for women on letrozole. One of the most common side effects—seen in two-thirds of in this study—was neutropenia.”

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Angiochem’s ANG1005 Shows Clinical Benefits and Prolonged Survival for Breast Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases

Excerpt:

“Angiochem, a biotechnology company developing peptide-drug conjugates uniquely capable of crossing the blood-brain barrier, recently presented data from its Phase II trial for its lead compound, ANG1005, at two highly regarded international cancer conferences: The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) 2016 Congress and the European Association of Neuro-Oncology (EANO) 2016 Meeting.

“On Friday Oct 7th, 2016 at the ESMO Congress, Copenhagen, Denmark, Shou-Ching Tang, MD, PhD Leader, Breast Cancer Multidisciplinary Program, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA presented a podium presentation titled: ANG1005, a novel peptide-paclitaxel conjugate crosses the BBB and shows activity in patients with recurrent CNS metastasis from breast cancer, results from a phase II clinical study.”

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Study Finds Ribociclib Improves Progression-Free Survival for Women with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“In a randomized, Phase III trial led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, ribociclib, in combination with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole, dramatically improved progression-free survival (PFS) of post-menopausal women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer, compared to the hormone therapy alone.

“The study found a 44 percent improvement in PFS with ribociclib, a CDK4/6 inhibitor, and letrozole as a front line therapy. Gabriel Hortobagyi, M.D., professor of Breast Medical Oncology, presented the findings at ESMO 2016 Congress, and is the corresponding author of the New England Journal of Medicine paper.”

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Super Patient: Jessica Leip Makes an Impact on Metastatic Breast Cancer Research

Jessica Leip was diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer in 2013. Since then, she has become very active with the Metastatic Breast Cancer Project, an organization that collects samples and data from patients in order to accelerate research. We asked Jessica about her own cancer experiences and her involvement with the MBCProject: Continue reading…


Encouraging Results For Ribociclib In Advanced Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“At the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Congress this week, investigators presented data for a new and potentially important drug, ribociclib (Novartis). This oral medication is clearly active in hormone receptor-positive (ER+ or PR+) breast cancer. The findings of the MONALEESA trial were published in the NEJM.

“The main result is that for the most common form of advanced breast cancer, adding ribociclib to letrozole significantly improved progression-free survival (PFS), as compared to adding a placebo. After a year and a half (18 months) in this randomized, controlled clinical trial, PFS among women receiving ribociclib was 63.0%, vs. 42.2% in the placebo arm. That’s a big difference, when you consider that 99% of the patients on the study have stage 4, metastatic breast cancer.”

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New Research Takes Aim at Deadliest Form of Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“Forget the pink ribbons. Spitting in a tube for science is what unites a growing group of breast cancer patients taking part in a unique project to advance treatment for the deadliest form of the disease.

“For many of the 150,000-plus patients nationwide whose tumors have spread to bones, brains, lungs or other distant organs, the hue heralding breast cancer awareness and survival each October is a little too rosy. They know cancer will likely kill them. And they’ve often felt neglected by mainstream advocacy and medical research.”

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