Array BioPharma Announces FDA Acceptance For Review Of Binimetinib And Encorafenib New Drug Applications For Patients With Advanced BRAF-mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Array BioPharma (ARRY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted for review its New Drug Applications (NDAs) to support use of the combination of binimetinib 45 mg twice daily and encorafenib 450 mg once daily (COMBO450) for the treatment of patients with BRAF-mutant advanced, unresectable or metastatic melanoma. The FDA set a target action date under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act (PDUFA) of June 30, 2018 for both applications. In addition, the FDA informed Array that based on their preliminary review of the applications they have not identified any potential review issues, and that they are not currently planning to hold an advisory committee meeting to discuss these NDAs.  Array completed its NDA submissions at the end of June 2017based on findings from the pivotal Phase 3 COLUMBUS trial.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Immunotherapy Combination Safe and 62 Percent Effective in Metastatic Melanoma Patients

Excerpt:

“Immunotherapy is a promising approach in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, an aggressive and deadly form of skin cancer; but for most patients, immunotherapy drugs so far have failed to live up to their promise and provide little or no benefit. In a phase 1b clinical trial with 21 patients, researchers tested the safety and efficacy of combining the immunotherapy drug pembrolizumab with an oncolytic virus called T-VEC. The results suggest that this combination treatment, which had a 62% response rate, may work better than using either therapy on its own. The study appears September 7 in the journal Cell.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Study: Common Surgical Treatment for Melanoma Does Not Improve Patients’ Overall Survival

Excerpt:

“Patients who receive the standard surgical treatment for melanoma that has spread to one or more key lymph nodes do not live longer, a major new study shows.

“The study, published today in The New England Journal of Medicine, found that immediately removing and performing biopsies on all lymph nodes located near the original tumor, a procedure called completion lymph node dissection, did not result in increased overall survival rates.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Array BioPharma Announces Positive Top-Line Results from Part 2 of the Phase 3 COLUMBUS Study of Binimetinib and Encorafenib for BRAF-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“Array BioPharma (Nasdaq: ARRY) today announced top-line results from Part 2 of the Phase 3 COLUMBUS study evaluating binimetinib, a MEK inhibitor, and encorafenib, a BRAF inhibitor, in patients with BRAF-mutant advanced, unresectable or metastatic melanoma. The primary analysis of Part 2 compared progression free survival (PFS) in patients treated with binimetinib 45mg twice daily plus encorafenib 300mg daily (COMBO300) to patients treated with encorafenib 300mg daily as a single agent. The median PFS for patients treated with COMBO300 was 12.9 months compared to 9.2 months for patients treated with single agent encorafenib, with HR of 0.77 [95% CI 0.61-0.97, p=0.029]. COMBO300 was generally well-tolerated and reported dose intensity and adverse events were consistent with COMBO450 results in COLUMBUS Part 1. Part 2 was designed specifically to assess the contribution of binimetinib to the combination of binimetinib and encorafenib by reducing the dose of encorafenib to 300mg in the combination arm to allow for a comparison of equal doses across arms. Further results from Part 2 will be presented at a medical meeting during the second half of 2017.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Metastatic Melanoma: Not Quite Curable…But Getting There


By 2050, the number of deaths due to malignant melanoma in the U.S. could be three times lower than peak levels reached before 1960. Researchers presented the data behind this prediction at the 2017 European Cancer Congress in January.

It is unclear how much of this anticipated decline in deaths can be attributed to the availability of new, effective treatments. However, it is obvious that much-increased awareness of sunlight exposure as the single factor most responsible for the development of skin melanoma has contributed to lower incidence of the disease.

In any case, the armament of treatments available for metastatic melanoma is currently such that this diagnosis has transformed from being almost universally fatal (even just a few years ago) into a being largely treatable. Since 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved eight new drugs for melanoma. Continue reading…


Innovative Immunotherapy Combo Tests IDO Inhibitor in Melanoma Trial

Excerpt:

“Investigators are looking into a novel immunotherapy combination that pairs the first-in-class IDO1 inhibitor epacadostat (INCB024360) with the checkpoint blockade agent pembrolizumab (Keytruda) in patients with unresectable or metastatic melanoma.

“The phase III KEYNOTE-252/ECHO-301 trial, which is enrolling at more than 120 locations, will randomize 600 patients in a 1:1 ratio to either epacadostat combined with pembrolizumab or pembrolizumab plus placebo (NCT02752074).”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Binimetinib Delayed Progression of NRAS-Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“The MEK inhibitor binimetinib improved progression-free survival compared with dacarbazine in patients with NRAS-mutant melanoma, according to the phase III results of the NEMO trial published in Lancet Oncology.

“In addition, improved progression-free survival was seen in patients who had previously failed immunotherapy, the current guideline-recommended first-line treatment.

” ‘Future treatment algorithms for metastatic melanoma might incorporate binimetinib therapy in patients with advanced NRAS-mutant melanoma, including after the failure of immunotherapy,’ wrote Reinhard Dummer, MD, of the department of dermatology at the University Hospital Zurich Skin Cancer Center in Switzerland, and colleagues.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.


Super Patient: Peter Fortenbaugh Faces the Uncertainty of Pioneering Melanoma Treatment


In spring of 2014, Peter Fortenbaugh noticed what appeared to be a tick that had bitten his lower calf. “It turned out not to be a tick, but it didn’t really go away,” he says.

The spot began to grow and bulge, and in October, Peter showed it to his primary care doctor, who referred him to a dermatologist to remove it. At the time, Peter recalls, it did not occur to him that the growth could be serious.

“I was actually very concerned about skin cancer because I spent a lot of time out in the sun sailing,” Peter says. “I put on a tremendous amount of sunscreen and protection, but never on my legs…I never connected the dots.”

However, a biopsy of the growth came back positive for melanoma. Peter, who lives in Palo Alto, California, with his wife and three children, immediately reached out to several doctors in the San Francisco Bay Area, and all had the same advice: “Take it out, take a biopsy.” Continue reading…


COLUMBUS Trial: Binimetinib plus Encorafenib Improves PFS in BRAF–Mutant Melanoma

Excerpt:

“The phase 3 COLUMBUS trial, designed to evaluate binimetinib plus encorafenib for the treatment of BRAF–mutant melanoma, met its primary endpoint of improving PFS over vemurafenib, according to the drug’s manufacturer.

“These results also were presented at the Society for Melanoma Research Congress in Boston.

“In part 1 of the trial, researchers randomly assigned 577 patients with locally advanced, unresectable or metastatic melanoma with BRAF V600mutations to receive 45 mg binimetinib (MEK162, Array BioPharma) plus 450 mg of encorafenib (LGX818, Array BioPharma), 300 mg encorafenib monotherapy or 960 mg vemurafenib (Zelboraf, Genentech) monotherapy.”

Go to full article.

If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our ASK Cancer Commons service.