Drug Yields High Response Rates for Lung Cancer Patients With Harsh Mutation

Excerpt:

“A targeted therapy resurrected by the Moon Shots Program™ at The University of Texas MD AndersonCancer Center has produced unprecedented response rates among patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer that carries a highly treatment-resistant mutation.

“In a phase 2 clinical trial, the drug poziotinib has shrunk tumors by at least 30 percent in eight of 11 (73 percent) non-small cell lung cancer patients whose cancer includes an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation called an exon 20 insertion.  Shrinkage ranged from 30 percent to 50 percent among the eight patients reaching partial response.  One patient has progressed on the clinical trial, which began in March.  All patients experienced some tumor shrinkage.”

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Adding Radiation Treatments to Inoperable Lung Cancer Increases Survival by up to One Year

Excerpt:

“Patients with unresectable, or inoperable, lung cancer are often given a dismal prognosis, with low rates of survival beyond a few years. Researchers exploring combination therapies have recently discovered improved survival rates by up to one year when patients treated with a newly formulated chemotherapy regimen are also given radiation therapy.

“A group of patients with metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer (mNSCLC) who had already been enrolled in a clinical trial were given radiation therapy, in addition to their treatment with a novel chemotherapy formulation, mPEBev, which was designed for its immune-modulating and anti-angiogenic effects. The mPEBev regimen is composed of fractionated cisplatin, oral etoposide, and bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody that inhibits blood vessel growth in the tumor. Treatments were administered metronomically, spaced out in the safest possible doses to reduce side-effects and toxicity.”

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FDA Approves Tafinlar Plus Mekinist for BRAF V600E–Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA approved use of dabrafenib in combination with trametinib for treatment of patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer whose tumors harbor BRAF V600E mutations, according to the agents’ manufacturer.

“The combination of dabrafenib (Tafinlar, Novartis) — a BRAF inhibitor — and trametinib (Mekinist, Novartis), a MEK1/2 inhibitor — is the first targeted treatment approved in the United States specifically for patients with BRAF V600E–positive metastatic NSCLC.”

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Durable Responses Seen With Sacituzumab Govitecan in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The antibody-drug conjugate sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132) was well-tolerated and produced a median duration of response of 6.0 months in previously treated patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), according to results from a single-arm, multicenter trial.

“The results, which were published online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed a median progression-free survival of 5.2 months (95% CI, 3.2-7.1) and median overall survival of 9.5 months (95% CI, 5.9-16.7) in the intent-to-treat population. The clinical benefit rate of 43%.”

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Avelumab Shows Promise as Frontline Immunotherapy Alternative in NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Immunotherapy is quickly becoming a mainstay in the frontline setting for the treatment of patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“In October 2016, the FDA approved the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) as a first-line treatment for patients with metastatic NSCLC whose tumors have at least 50% PD-L1 expression and who do not harbor EGFR or ALK mutations.”

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Atezolizumab Improves Survival vs Docetaxel in Previously Treated Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“In the phase III OAK trial reported in The Lancet by Rittmeyer et al, treatment with the anti–programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) antibody atezolizumab (Tecentriq) improved overall survival vs docetaxel in previously treated non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Results of the trial supported the recent approval of atezolizumab in metastatic NSCLC in patients who have received prior platinum-containing therapy.”

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FDA Approves Atezolizumab for Lung Cancer

Excerpt:

“The FDA has approved atezolizumab (Tecentriq) for the treatment of patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have progressed after a platinum-containing regimen and an FDA-approved targeted therapy for those patients harboring EGFR or ALK abnormalities.

“The approval is based on multiple clinical trials, the largest being the phase III OAK trial, which was presented at the 2016 ESMO Congress. In the study, atezolizumab reduced the risk of death by 26% compared with docetaxel in patients with advanced NSCLC following the failure of platinum-based chemotherapy. The median overall survival (OS) was improved by 4.2 months with the PD-L1 inhibitor versus chemotherapy. The survival benefit with atezolizumab was observed regardless of PD-L1 status or histology.”

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Bevacizumab/Erlotinib Combo Approved in Europe for NSCLC

Excerpt:

“The European Commission approved bevacizumab (Avastin) in combination with erlotinib (Tarceva) as a frontline treatment for patients with unresectable advanced, metastatic, or recurrent EGFR-mutant non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).

“The approval was based on findings from the phase II JO25567 study, which showed a 46% reduction in the risk of progression or death with the combination versus single-agent erlotinib. The median progression-free survival (PFS) with the addition of bevacizumab was 16 versus 9.7 months with erlotinib alone (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.36-0.79; P = .0015).

“ ‘The combination of Avastin and Tarceva represents a new standard of care for patients with this type of lung cancer,’ Sandra Horning, MD, chief medical officer and Global Head of Product Development at Roche, the company developing the combination, said in a statement. ‘This approval provides physicians in Europe with a powerful combination therapy that can significantly extend progression-free survival beyond 1 year, representing important progress for a group of patients who typically face a poor prognosis.’ ”

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Sacituzumab Govitecan Shows Promise for Metastatic NSCLC

Excerpt:

“Treatment with sacituzumab govitecan induced objective responses and appeared tolerable in patients with metastatic non–small cell lung cancer who had received first-line platinum-based therapy, according to the results from an expansion cohort of a phase 1/2 study presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

” ‘This therapy showed efficacy for squamous and non-squamous patients as well as for patients with prior PD-1/PD-L1 therapy,’ D. Ross Camidge, MD, PhD, professor in the division of medical oncology and Joyce Zeff chair in lung cancer research at University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus, said during a presentation.

Sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132, Immunomedics) is an antibody drug conjugate comprised of SN-38 — the active metabolite of irinotecan, a topoisomerase inhibitor — conjugated to an anti–Trop-2 humanized monoclonal antibody.”

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