Metformin Use Does Not Increase Prostate Cancer Survival

Excerpt:

“Metformin use in combination with docetaxel chemotherapy does not significantly improve survival in patients with diabetes and metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer, according to a study published in the April issue of The Journal of Urology.

“Michelle J. Mayer, from Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto, and colleagues used data from several Ontario administrative health care databases to identify men (older than 65 years) diagnosed with metastatic castration-resistant cancer and treated with docetaxel. Patients were stratified into groups based on diabetes status and use of antidiabetic medications to assess the effect of use with docetaxel on survival.”

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Statin, Metformin Combination Reduces Prostate Cancer Mortality, Particularly Among Obese Men

“The combined use of statins and metformin reduced disease-specific mortality in patients with prostate cancer, according to population-based study results presented at the ASCO Annual Meeting.

“Patients with obesity and metabolic syndromes demonstrated particular efficacy from the combination, the researchers also found.

“ ‘A recent preclinical study showed that combined statin and metformin should have a synergistic effect to reduce metastasis [in patients with prostate cancer], and should be more effective than the standard chemotherapy regimen available,’ Grace L. Lu-Yao, PhD, MPH, professor of medicine at Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and resident member of the Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, told HemOnc Today. ‘We conducted this study because there really is no clinical data out there.’ “


Effect of Metformin on RCC Survival Warrants Further Study

Editor’s note: This article is about a research study that looked at the effects of taking the anti-diabetes drug metformin before surgery for renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The researchers found that metformin might improve patients’ survival times. However, more research is needed to see whether metformin is truly beneficial.

“Patient exposure to metformin before undergoing nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) may have an effect on patient survival, according to the results of a study published recently in Urologic Oncology.

“Results of the study showed a positive effect of the anti-diabetes drug in an unadjusted analysis; however, this effect was not seen on multivariable analysis.

“ ‘Interest in metformin as a possible therapeutic option for RCC has been generated by emerging data from both observation and prospective studies assessing the association between risk of cancer-related death and exposure to metformin for a variety of malignancies,’ wrote Sarah P. Psutka, MD, of the department of urology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., and colleagues.”


Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.


Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.


Glucophage Linked to Improved Survival for Cancer Patients with Diabetes

Patients with type 2 diabetes are at higher risk of several cancers. However, patients taking the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) have a lower risk of developing some kinds of cancer. Now, a review of several studies suggests that Glucophage also improves survival rates for patients who already have cancer. Patients with cancer and diabetes who took Glucophage had a lower risk of death overall, and of dying of cancer specifically, compared to patients receiving other diabetes medications. It is not certain that Glucophage indeed caused the survival benefit. Separate, independent factors could make patients both more likely to be prescribed Glucophage and to have better survival. However, because there is at least a strong possibility of a benefit, the review authors recommend Glucophage as the drug of choice for diabetes patients with cancer.


Crowdsourcing to Be Used in Metformin Prostate Cancer Trial

Transparency Life Sciences (TLS), along with Matthew Galsky, M.D., associate professor of medicine in the Division of Hematology/Oncology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, will be designing and conducting a pilot trial assessing the diabetes drug metformin as a potential treatment for prostate cancer. This collaboration will also test using crowdsourcing to obtain input to the design of the clinical protocol, and telemonitoring to replace most patient site visits. TLS will be partnering with AMC Health, a provider of telehealth services, to conduct the metformin study.”


Diabetes Drug Glucophage May Make Radiation Therapy More Effective

Past studies have suggested that the diabetes drug metformin (Glucophage) may make lung cancer tumors more susceptible to radiation and therefore, make radiation therapy more effective. Researchers therefore analyzed the medical records of patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who had been treated with radiation and chemotherapy. Sixteen of these patients had been taking Glucophage at the time. All of the Glucophage-treated patients are still alive and the cancer has returned in only two so far (an average of 10.4 months after the treatment)–better outcomes than what was seen in the patients who were not on Glucophage. Glucophage also made tumors more sensitive to radiation treatment in a mouse model of lung cancer.


Diabetes Drug With Chemo, Radiation May Improve Outcomes for Lung Cancer

Treating aggressive lung cancer with the diabetes drug metformin along with radiation and chemotherapy may slow tumor growth and recurrence, suggests new preliminary findings from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

The preclinical and clinical results, which have set the stage for a first-of-its-kind prospective study, point to metformin as an effective radiosensitizer — a drug that makes tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy — to treat stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Because of poor local response and five-year survival rates around 15 percent in late-stage NSCLC patients, well-tolerated, combination therapies are greatly needed.