ASCO: Targeted Tx Combo Stalls NSCLC

“Adding bevacizumab (Avastin) to first-line targeted therapy delayed progression in a subgroup of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), an open-label trial showed.

“Progression-free survival was 46% better with bevacizumab plus erlotinib (Tarceva), at 16.0 months compared with 9.7 on erlotinib alone in an EGFR mutation-positive population (P=0.0015), Terufumi Kato, MD, of Kanagawa Cardiovascular and Respiratory Center in Yokohama, Japan, and colleagues found.”

Editor’s note: A combination of two targeted therapy drugs has shown promise for treating some patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The two drugs are called bevacizumab (brand name Avastin) and erlotinib (brand name Tarceva). The research described in this story found that the combination works better for patients whose tumors have mutations in the EGFR gene (as detected by molecular testing) than erlotinib alone.


Molecular Tumor Board Helps in Advanced Cancer Cases

With accelerating development of personalized cancer treatments matched to a patient’s DNA sequencing, proponents say frontline physicians increasingly need help to maneuver through the complex genomic landscape to find the most effective, individualized therapy.

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized medicine and molecular (genetic) testing on our website.


Molecular Tumor Board Helps in Advanced Cancer Cases

With accelerating development of personalized cancer treatments matched to a patient’s DNA sequencing, proponents say frontline physicians increasingly need help to maneuver through the complex genomic landscape to find the most effective, individualized therapy.

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized medicine and molecular (genetic) testing on our website.


Molecular Tumor Board Helps in Advanced Cancer Cases

With accelerating development of personalized cancer treatments matched to a patient’s DNA sequencing, proponents say frontline physicians increasingly need help to maneuver through the complex genomic landscape to find the most effective, individualized therapy.

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized medicine and molecular (genetic) testing on our website.


Tracking the Clonal Origin of Lethal Prostate Cancer

“Recent controversies surrounding prostate cancer overtreatment emphasize the critical need to delineate the molecular features associated with progression to lethal metastatic disease. Here, we have used whole-genome sequencing and molecular pathological analyses to characterize the lethal cell clone in a patient who died of prostate cancer. We tracked the evolution of the lethal cell clone from the primary cancer to metastases through samples collected during disease progression and at the time of death. Surprisingly, these analyses revealed that the lethal clone arose from a small, relatively low-grade cancer focus in the primary tumor, and not from the bulk, higher-grade primary cancer or from a lymph node metastasis resected at prostatectomy. Despite being limited to one case, these findings highlight the potential importance of developing and implementing molecular prognostic and predictive markers, such as alterations of tumor suppressor proteins PTEN or p53, to augment current pathological evaluation and delineate clonal heterogeneity. Furthermore, this case illustrates the potential need in precision medicine to longitudinally sample metastatic lesions to capture the evolving constellation of alterations during progression. Similar comprehensive studies of additional prostate cancer cases are warranted to understand the extent to which these issues may challenge prostate cancer clinical management.”


Understanding Why

“For patients with high-risk prostate cancer, treatment with both androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and ionizing radiation (IR) improves progression-free and overall survival and has long been the standard of care. Two papers published in Cancer Discovery unveil the molecular mechanisms that underpin this clinical response.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”


A Panoramic View of Cancer

“Genomics has already made great contributions to our understanding of cancer biology but, until now, has focused on characterizing individual cancer types. The Pan-Cancer Initiative of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) has now taken the next step — comparative genomic analyses across the 12 cancer types for which genomic data have so far been generated.”