CDK4/6 Inhibitor Shows Promise as Single Agent in HR+ Breast Cancer

Excerpt:

“As a single agent, abemaciclib has shown exciting potential in heavily pretreated patients with refractory, hormone-receptor (HR)–positive, HER2-negative advanced breast cancer, following phase II findings of the MONARCH 1 trial.

“Results of the single-arm study, which were presented during the 2016 ASCO Annual Meeting1, show that the CDK4/6 inhibitor induced a response rate of nearly 20% in this patient population. The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 6 months (95% CI 4.2-7.5) and the median overall survival (OS) was 17.7 months (95% CI, 16 to not reached). Previously, abemaciclib received a breakthrough therapy designation in this setting from the FDA in October 2015.”

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Lilly Announces Results from MONARCH 1 Trial of Abemaciclib Monotherapy

Excerpt:

“Eli Lilly and Company (LLY) today announced results from the MONARCH 1 Phase 2 study of abemaciclib, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and CDK 6 inhibitor, in patients with hormone-receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer. The data, which were presented at the 2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting by Maura Dickler, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, showed that single-agent activity was observed in metastatic breast cancer patients, for whom endocrine therapy was no longer a suitable treatment option. The MONARCH 1 results (abstract #510) confirmed objective response (ORR), durability of response (DoR), clinical benefit rate (CBR) and progression-free survival (PFS).

“The single-arm study, designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of abemaciclib monotherapy, enrolled 132 patients who were given 200 mg of abemaciclib orally every 12 hours until disease progression. Patients enrolled in the study were heavily pretreated, having experienced progressive disease on or after prior endocrine therapy, and had received prior chemotherapy with one or two chemotherapy regimens for metastatic disease. The primary objective of the trial was investigator-assessed ORR, with secondary endpoints of DoR, CBR and PFS.”

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