Two New Genes Involved in the More Aggressive Prostate Cancer

“A study by the Columbia University Nova York, in collaboration with the Catalan Institute of Oncology , Belvitge Biomedical Research Institute (ICO-IDIBELL) has identified two new genes that lead to more aggressive forms of prostate cancer. The work done by Alvaro Aytes under the direction of Cory Abate-Shen, director of the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center of the Columbia University, has been published in the latest issue of Cancer Cell.”

Editor’s note: More and more, oncologists are using tumor genetics to better understand and treat cancer. Learn more here.


Cancer Commons Publishes New Molecular Models of Lung Cancer and Melanoma

Cancer Commons aims to put the most up-to-date information about cancer treatment into the hands of patients. To keep this information current, Cancer Commons’ Chief Scientist Emma Shtivelman and collaborators periodically comb the scientific literature to compile and publish review papers that serve as “consensus models” of different cancer types and how they’re treated. Two new consensus models were recently published for lung cancer and melanoma in the scientific journal Oncotarget.

The new consensus models describe the molecular underpinnings of lung cancer and melanoma, and how different genetic mutations and other molecular-scale changes are used to develop different treatments. The models serve as the scientific foundation of the personalized, patient-friendly information Cancer Commons provides to lung cancer and melanoma patients, and they will be updated as new insights emerge.

Cancer Commons is also preparing a prostate cancer consensus model for publication. Consensus models for other cancer types may be published as we expand our services.

Both models are available free of charge on the Oncotarget website:

Lung Cancer

Melanoma


Molecular Tumor Board Helps in Advanced Cancer Cases

With accelerating development of personalized cancer treatments matched to a patient’s DNA sequencing, proponents say frontline physicians increasingly need help to maneuver through the complex genomic landscape to find the most effective, individualized therapy.

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized medicine and molecular (genetic) testing on our website.


Molecular Tumor Board Helps in Advanced Cancer Cases

With accelerating development of personalized cancer treatments matched to a patient’s DNA sequencing, proponents say frontline physicians increasingly need help to maneuver through the complex genomic landscape to find the most effective, individualized therapy.

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized medicine and molecular (genetic) testing on our website.


Molecular Tumor Board Helps in Advanced Cancer Cases

With accelerating development of personalized cancer treatments matched to a patient’s DNA sequencing, proponents say frontline physicians increasingly need help to maneuver through the complex genomic landscape to find the most effective, individualized therapy.

Editor’s note: Learn more about personalized medicine and molecular (genetic) testing on our website.


UPDATE 1-EU Agency Backs Approval of New GlaxoSmithKline Melanoma Drug

“GlaxoSmithKline’s melanoma drug Mekinist – one of several drugs being sold to Novartis under an asset swap deal – has been recommended for approval by European regulators.

“The European Medicines Agency (EMA) said on Friday its experts had backed the drug, also known as trametinib, as a treatment for unresectable or metastatic melanoma in patients with a mutation of a gene known as BRAF.”


Combination Therapies for Lung Cancer

“CANCER NETWORK: Dr. Jänne, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors are a mainstay of therapy for those advanced-stage lung cancer patients with tumors that harbor specific EGFR mutations. What have we learned in the last few years about which patients respond to which oral agents and antibodies against EGFR? “

Editor’s note: While not strictly “news,” this interview provides a good overview of currently available treatments for lung cancer.


Binimetinib Continues To Advance In Clinical Development

“Three Phase 3 trials with binimetinib continue to enroll in advanced cancer patients:  NRAS-mutant melanoma (NEMO / NCT01763164), low-grade serous ovarian cancer (MILO / NCT01849874) and BRAF-mutant melanoma (COLUMBUS / NCT01909453).  NRAS-mutant melanoma represents the first potential indication for binimetinib, with a projected regulatory filing from the NRAS-mutant melanoma study estimated to be in 2015.”

Editor’s note: This is a press release from a company that is testing a new potential treatment for melanoma called binimetinib, or “MEK162.” The drug is being tested in clinical trials (learn more about clinical trials). One of the trials is enrolling melanoma patients whose tumors have mutations in the NRAS gene, as detected by molecular testing. Another is enrolling patients with BRAF mutations.


New Test Could Accurately Predict Prostate Cancer Recurrence

“Researchers have created a test that they say can predict whether a man is at high risk of prostate cancer recurrence.

“The research team, led by Prof. Robert Bristow of the Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and the University of Toronto, both in Canada, presented their findings at the 33rd conference of the European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO33) in Vienna, Italy.

“For men with cancer confined to the prostate, surgery and precision radiotherapy are the primary treatments. However, Prof. Bristow explains that during initial treatment, whether the cancer has spread outside the prostate often goes undetected. This means the cancer will return in 30-50% of patients.”