Interferon-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tregs Limits Tumor Th17 Inflammation

“The capacity of IL-10 and Tregs in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment to impair anticancer Th1 immunity makes them attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. IL-10 and Tregs also suppress Th17 activity, which is associated with poor prognosis in several cancers. However, previous studies have overlooked their potential contribution to the regulation of pathogenic cancer-associated inflammation. In this study, we investigated the origin and function of IL-10–producing cells in the tumor microenvironment using transplantable tumor models in mice. The majority of tumor-associated IL-10 was produced by an activated Treg population. IL-10 production by Tregs was required to restrain Th17-type inflammation. Accumulation of activated IL-10+ Tregs in the tumor required type I IFN signaling but not inflammatory signaling pathways that depend on TLR adapter protein MyD88 or IL-12 family cytokines. IL-10 production limited Th17 cell numbers in both spleen and tumor. However, type I IFN was required to limit Th17 cells specifically in the tumor microenvironment, reflecting selective control of tumor-associated Tregs by type I IFN. Thus, the interplay of type I IFN, Tregs, and IL-10 is required to negatively regulate Th17 inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Therapeutic interference of this network could therefore have the undesirable consequence of promoting Th17 inflammation and cancer growth.”


Interferon-Dependent IL-10 Production by Tregs Limits Tumor Th17 Inflammation

“The capacity of IL-10 and Tregs in the inflammatory tumor microenvironment to impair anticancer Th1 immunity makes them attractive targets for cancer immunotherapy. IL-10 and Tregs also suppress Th17 activity, which is associated with poor prognosis in several cancers. However, previous studies have overlooked their potential contribution to the regulation of pathogenic cancer-associated inflammation. In this study, we investigated the origin and function of IL-10–producing cells in the tumor microenvironment using transplantable tumor models in mice. The majority of tumor-associated IL-10 was produced by an activated Treg population. IL-10 production by Tregs was required to restrain Th17-type inflammation. Accumulation of activated IL-10+ Tregs in the tumor required type I IFN signaling but not inflammatory signaling pathways that depend on TLR adapter protein MyD88 or IL-12 family cytokines. IL-10 production limited Th17 cell numbers in both spleen and tumor. However, type I IFN was required to limit Th17 cells specifically in the tumor microenvironment, reflecting selective control of tumor-associated Tregs by type I IFN. Thus, the interplay of type I IFN, Tregs, and IL-10 is required to negatively regulate Th17 inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Therapeutic interference of this network could therefore have the undesirable consequence of promoting Th17 inflammation and cancer growth.”


Epidermal EGFR Controls Cutaneous Host Defense and Prevents Inflammation

“The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) plays an important role in tissue homeostasis and tumor progression. However, cancer patients treated with EGFR inhibitors (EGFRIs) frequently develop acneiform skin toxicities, which are a strong predictor of a patient’s treatment response. We show that the early inflammatory infiltrate of the skin rash induced by EGFRI is dominated by dendritic cells, macrophages, granulocytes, mast cells, and T cells. EGFRIs induce the expression of chemokines (CCL2, CCL5, CCL27, and CXCL14) in epidermal keratinocytes and impair the production of antimicrobial peptides and skin barrier proteins. Correspondingly, EGFRI-treated keratinocytes facilitate lymphocyte recruitment but show a considerably reduced cytotoxic activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Mice lacking epidermal EGFR (EGFRΔep) show a similar phenotype, which is accompanied by chemokine-driven skin inflammation, hair follicle degeneration, decreased host defense, and deficient skin barrier function, as well as early lethality. Skin toxicities were not ameliorated in a Rag2-, MyD88-, and CCL2-deficient background or in mice lacking epidermal Langerhans cells. The skin phenotype was also not rescued in a hairless (hr/hr) background, demonstrating that skin inflammation is not induced by hair follicle degeneration. Treatment with mast cell inhibitors reduced the immigration of T cells, suggesting that mast cells play a role in the EGFRI-mediated skin pathology. Our findings demonstrate that EGFR signaling in keratinocytes regulates key factors involved in skin inflammation, barrier function, and innate host defense, providing insights into the mechanisms underlying EGFRI-induced skin pathologies.”