Breast Cancer Trends Predict Rising Numbers, Older Patients

“An evolving patient population will fuel as much as a 50% increase in the number of breast cancer cases over the next 15 years, according to National Cancer Institute (NCI) projections.

“If recent trends persist, the breast cancer burden in the U.S. will increase to 441,000 new cases a year by 2030. That compares with 283,000 cases in 2011 (the last year with complete data) and the American Cancer Society’s estimate of 292,000 for 2015, including invasive and in-situ cancers.

“The nature of the cancers will change as much, if not more, NCI biostatistician Philip S. Rosenberg, PhD, indicated during a press briefing at the American Association for Cancer Research meeting. The proportion of estrogen receptor (ER)-positive in-situ cancers (diagnosed almost exclusively by mammography) will increase by 50%, whereas the more difficult to treat ER-negative cancers (invasive and in-situ) will occur about 50% less often.

“Perhaps of even greater interest, the traditional predominance of the 50- to 69-year-old age group will decline by 20% to a plurality of 44% of all cases, whereas women 70 to 84 will account for 35% of all cases in 2030, almost a 50% increase.”


Decline in US Lung Cancer Rates, Varying by Race, Gender, Age

“Incidence rates are falling for lung cancer, the leading cancer killer of both men and women in the US. This is the conclusion that a new analysis from the National Cancer Institute has come to, with previously unrecognized trends found with regard to age, ethnicity, race, sex and cancer subtype.

“The findings of Dr. Denise Lewis and her colleagues at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are published in CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society (ACS).

“According to the American Lung Association (ALA), lung cancer causes more deaths in the US than the next three most common cancers – breast, colorectal and pancreatic cancer – combined. In 2014, it is estimated that 159,260 Americans will die as a result of lung cancer.

“Before the new research, it had been acknowledged that lung cancer incidence rates were falling across the US, but little was known about trends relating to the different subtypes of cancer, such as squamous and small cell carcinomas, or about different demographic groups.”


Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

“The National Cancer Institute is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year.  The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initiation and completion of cancer clinical trials based on improvements in data management infrastructure, the development of a standardized process for prioritization of new studies, consolidation of its component research groups to improve efficiency, and the implementation of a unified system of research subject protection at over 3,000 clinical trials sites.  Grants to fund the program will be awarded early in the spring of 2014…

“NCTN employs an inclusive process for generating studies and conducting clinical trials using broad representation from the oncology field, including academic researchers, as well as professional organizations, patients, and advocates.  In particular, community-based clinical trials play an important role in expanding the implementation of research findings to encompass all phases of cancer care delivery.  A new system to support clinical trials research in the community setting, the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), which will play a critical, complementary role to the NCTN, is being launched later this year and will involve both cancer treatment and cancer care delivery research.”


Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

“The National Cancer Institute is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year.  The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initiation and completion of cancer clinical trials based on improvements in data management infrastructure, the development of a standardized process for prioritization of new studies, consolidation of its component research groups to improve efficiency, and the implementation of a unified system of research subject protection at over 3,000 clinical trials sites.  Grants to fund the program will be awarded early in the spring of 2014…

“NCTN employs an inclusive process for generating studies and conducting clinical trials using broad representation from the oncology field, including academic researchers, as well as professional organizations, patients, and advocates.  In particular, community-based clinical trials play an important role in expanding the implementation of research findings to encompass all phases of cancer care delivery.  A new system to support clinical trials research in the community setting, the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), which will play a critical, complementary role to the NCTN, is being launched later this year and will involve both cancer treatment and cancer care delivery research.”


Implementation of the NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network

“The National Cancer Institute is launching a new clinical trials research network intended to improve treatment for the more than 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year.  The new system, NCI’s National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN), will facilitate the rapid initiation and completion of cancer clinical trials based on improvements in data management infrastructure, the development of a standardized process for prioritization of new studies, consolidation of its component research groups to improve efficiency, and the implementation of a unified system of research subject protection at over 3,000 clinical trials sites.  Grants to fund the program will be awarded early in the spring of 2014…

“NCTN employs an inclusive process for generating studies and conducting clinical trials using broad representation from the oncology field, including academic researchers, as well as professional organizations, patients, and advocates.  In particular, community-based clinical trials play an important role in expanding the implementation of research findings to encompass all phases of cancer care delivery.  A new system to support clinical trials research in the community setting, the NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP), which will play a critical, complementary role to the NCTN, is being launched later this year and will involve both cancer treatment and cancer care delivery research.”


Squamous Lung Cancer ‘Master Protocol’ Brings Cancer Research into the 21st Century


Clinical trials help determine whether new cancer treatments are safe and effective, and they provide access to cutting-edge drugs that patients wouldn’t otherwise be able to have. But the clinical trial system is notoriously inefficient, slow, expensive, and laborious. Now, a new and ambitious clinical trial design called the Lung Cancer Master Protocol seeks to overhaul the system, promising to benefit patients and drug companies alike. Continue reading…


Criteria for the Use of Omics-Based Predictors in Clinical Trials

“The US National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with scientists representing multiple areas of expertise relevant to ‘omics’-based test development, has developed a checklist of criteria that can be used to determine the readiness of omics-based tests for guiding patient care in clinical trials. The checklist criteria cover issues relating to specimens, assays, mathematical modelling, clinical trial design, and ethical, legal and regulatory aspects. Funding bodies and journals are encouraged to consider the checklist, which they may find useful for assessing study quality and evidence strength. The checklist will be used to evaluate proposals for NCI-sponsored clinical trials in which omics tests will be used to guide therapy.”


Criteria for the Use of Omics-Based Predictors in Clinical Trials

“The US National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with scientists representing multiple areas of expertise relevant to ‘omics’-based test development, has developed a checklist of criteria that can be used to determine the readiness of omics-based tests for guiding patient care in clinical trials. The checklist criteria cover issues relating to specimens, assays, mathematical modelling, clinical trial design, and ethical, legal and regulatory aspects. Funding bodies and journals are encouraged to consider the checklist, which they may find useful for assessing study quality and evidence strength. The checklist will be used to evaluate proposals for NCI-sponsored clinical trials in which omics tests will be used to guide therapy.”


Criteria for the Use of Omics-Based Predictors in Clinical Trials

“The US National Cancer Institute (NCI), in collaboration with scientists representing multiple areas of expertise relevant to ‘omics’-based test development, has developed a checklist of criteria that can be used to determine the readiness of omics-based tests for guiding patient care in clinical trials. The checklist criteria cover issues relating to specimens, assays, mathematical modelling, clinical trial design, and ethical, legal and regulatory aspects. Funding bodies and journals are encouraged to consider the checklist, which they may find useful for assessing study quality and evidence strength. The checklist will be used to evaluate proposals for NCI-sponsored clinical trials in which omics tests will be used to guide therapy.”