Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans

Most people who survive cancer are left to deal with the physical and emotional aftermath of treatment on their own—but they still need help. Long-term side effects of cancer treatments range from heart damage and painful nerve death to depression and body image disorders. However, a recent survey found that only 17% of people who survived cancer were given a long-term care plan. Cancer survivors can seek help at seven U.S. centers that focus on care after cancer, as well as the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Cancer Survivorship. The U.S. has nearly 14 million cancer survivors today, with 18 million expected by 2022.


Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans

Most people who survive cancer are left to deal with the physical and emotional aftermath of treatment on their own—but they still need help. Long-term side effects of cancer treatments range from heart damage and painful nerve death to depression and body image disorders. However, a recent survey found that only 17% of people who survived cancer were given a long-term care plan. Cancer survivors can seek help at seven U.S. centers that focus on care after cancer, as well as the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Cancer Survivorship. The U.S. has nearly 14 million cancer survivors today, with 18 million expected by 2022.


Cancer Survivors Need Long-Term Care Plans

Most people who survive cancer are left to deal with the physical and emotional aftermath of treatment on their own—but they still need help. Long-term side effects of cancer treatments range from heart damage and painful nerve death to depression and body image disorders. However, a recent survey found that only 17% of people who survived cancer were given a long-term care plan. Cancer survivors can seek help at seven U.S. centers that focus on care after cancer, as well as the National Cancer Institute’s Office of Cancer Survivorship. The U.S. has nearly 14 million cancer survivors today, with 18 million expected by 2022.


Three Genes Linked to Nerve Damage from Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy damages nerves in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy) of up to one-third of those treated, but there’s no way to tell who will suffer this side effect. That may change soon—three genes are linked to peripheral neuropathy, researchers reported at the American Association for Cancer Research’s 2013 meeting. The researchers sequenced 20,000 genes from 119 people and found those who developed peripheral neuropathy during chemotherapy were also more likely to have mutations in genes called EPHA5, ARHGEF10, and PRX. Next, the researchers plan to expand the study to the entire genomes of up to 1,000 people being treated with chemotherapy.


Three Genes Linked to Nerve Damage from Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy damages nerves in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy) of up to one-third of those treated, but there’s no way to tell who will suffer this side effect. That may change soon—three genes are linked to peripheral neuropathy, researchers reported at the American Association for Cancer Research’s 2013 meeting. The researchers sequenced 20,000 genes from 119 people and found those who developed peripheral neuropathy during chemotherapy were also more likely to have mutations in genes called EPHA5, ARHGEF10, and PRX. Next, the researchers plan to expand the study to the entire genomes of up to 1,000 people being treated with chemotherapy.


Three Genes Linked to Nerve Damage from Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy damages nerves in the hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy) of up to one-third of those treated, but there’s no way to tell who will suffer this side effect. That may change soon—three genes are linked to peripheral neuropathy, researchers reported at the American Association for Cancer Research’s 2013 meeting. The researchers sequenced 20,000 genes from 119 people and found those who developed peripheral neuropathy during chemotherapy were also more likely to have mutations in genes called EPHA5, ARHGEF10, and PRX. Next, the researchers plan to expand the study to the entire genomes of up to 1,000 people being treated with chemotherapy.