NET Oncogene Patterns Don’t Fit the Classic Mold

Excerpt:

“Matthew H. Kulke, MD, MMSc, has been a leader in the development of new therapies and clinical management strategies for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

“In a recent milestone, Kulke presented phase III clinical trial data at the 2015 European Cancer Congress indicating that telotristat etiprate, a novel tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, improves diarrhea control in combination with a somatostatin analog for patients with metastatic NETs and inadequately controlled carcinoid syndrome. In the clinical arena, Kulke serves as co-chair for the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines panel on NETs and also is an active member of medical society advisory boards and task forces related to NETs.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Excitement Continues to Build for Advances in Neuroendocrine Tumor Field

Excerpt:

“It’s been an exciting year thus far for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), with the FDA approving a new treatment regimen and more advancements on the horizon, according to James C. Yao, MD, a professor in the Department of Gastrointestinal (GI) Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center.

“In February, the FDA approved everolimus (Afinitor) as a treatment for patients with progressive, well-differentiated, non-functional NETs of GI or lung origin with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. The mTOR inhibitor has been approved since 2011 for unresectable or advanced pancreatic NETs.

“Meanwhile, the agency is evaluating Lutathera (177Lutetium DOTA-octreotate), a peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT), for patients with gastroenteropancreatic NETs under its priority review program. Similarly, telotristat etiprate, a small-molecule tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, also is being considered under the FDA’s priority review program for carcinoid syndrome in patients with metastatic NETs.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


FDA Approval Sought for Telotristat Etiprate for Carcinoid Syndrome

Excerpt:

“A new drug application (NDA) has been submitted to the FDA for telotristat etiprate as a treatment for carcinoid syndrome in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), according to a statement from the drug’s developer, Lexicon Pharmaceuticals.

“The application was based on data from two phase III trials, both of which demonstrated significant reductions in the frequency of daily bowel movements with telotristat etiprate versus placebo. In the first study, TELESTAR, telotristat etiprate reduced daily bowel movements by up to 35%. In the second study, TELECAST, there was also a significant reduction in bowel movements (P ≤.004), although the exact data were not yet released.

“The FDA will review the NDA within 60 days of submission, at which point the agency will assign a review deadline under the Prescription Drug User Fee Act. Lexicon requested a priority review for the NDA, which would provide a 6-month deadline if the designation is granted.”

Go to full article.

Do you have questions about this story? Let us know in a comment below. If you’re wondering whether this story applies to your own cancer case or a loved one’s, we invite you to use our Ask Cancer Commons service.


Late Stage Trial Cements Lutetium Octreotate in Second-Line Setting

With updated data further proving its efficacy, Jonathan R. Strosberg, MD, says Lu-Dotatate 177 could be an excellent addition to oncologists’ armamentarium against midgut neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

“The randomized phase III NETTER-1 trial examined the efficacy of the peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) Lu-Dotatate as a treatment for patients with midgut NETs, specifically in the small intestine and proximal colon.

“The trial recruited 229 patients with inoperable, somatostatin receptor-positive NETs. All patients had progressed on standard-dose somatostatin analog therapy and were evenly randomized to either 4 administrations of 7.4 gigabecquerel of Lu-Dotatate every 8 weeks, or a control arm receiving high-dose octreotide LAR of 60 mg every 4 weeks.”


Expert Discusses Emerging Treatments, Immunotherapy Potential in pNETs

“Several recent studies have shown promise for the treatment of pancreatic NETs (pNETs). In the phase II CALGB-80701, which investigated the addition of bevacizumab (Avastin) to a treatment paradigm of everolimus and octreotide (Sandostatin) LAR in patients with locally advanced or metastatic pNETs, bevacizumab extended progression-free survival (PFS) by more than 3 months compared with everolimus and octreotide LAR alone.

“Response rate was also higher in the bevacizumab arm, with a 31% response to everolimus plus bevacizumab versus a 12% response in the control arm. Toxicity, however, was significantly higher in the bevacizumab arm.”


Gene Mutation Signals Poor Prognosis for Pancreatic Tumors

“For patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors, the presence of recently identified mutations in two key genes is a prognostic factor for poor outcome, researchers report.

” ‘We found loss of nuclear expression in about 23% of the tumors that we studied, and this loss of expression was associated with worse tumors from the outset,’ lead investigator Michelle Heayn, MD, a second-year pathology resident at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, told Medscape Medical News.

“Pancreatic tumors with neuroendocrine histology frequently respond to chemotherapy and have a more favorable prognosis than the more common pancreatic adenocarcinomas. However, the mutations are associated with worse disease-free and disease-specific survival.”


Lexicon's Telotristat Etiprate Shows Clinical Benefit In Treating Carcinoid Syndrome In Cancer Patients When Added To Standard Of Care

“Lexicon Pharmaceuticals, Inc.’s (Nasdaq: LXRX) telotristat etiprate was shown to have clinical benefit in treating carcinoid syndrome in cancer patients not adequately controlled by long-acting somatostatin analog (SSA) therapy, the current standard of care, according to data from the Phase 3 TELESTAR study presented today at the European Cancer Congress in Vienna, Austria.

“Telotristat etiprate, Lexicon’s most advanced product candidate, met the study’s primary endpoint with clinically meaningful reductions in bowel movement frequency in patients whose condition was not adequately controlled by SSA therapy. Carcinoid syndrome is characterized by frequent and debilitating diarrhea that often prevents patients from leading active, predictable lives, as well as by facial flushing, abdominal pain, heart valve damage and other serious consequences.

” ‘We are pleased with the efficacy and safety results of telotristat etiprate and also with the durability of the response shown in this study,’ said Lexicon Executive Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Pablo Lapuerta, M.D. ‘The data also support that the compound is acting directly on the cause of carcinoid syndrome, by reducing serotonin production within tumor cells.’ “


Results of International Trial Show Promise in Rare, Difficult to Treat Cancer

“Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) develop in the neuroendocrine system, responsible for producing the hormones that regulate the working of different organs in the body. They are rare, incurable, and treatments for them are limited, especially once they have become advanced. Now an international team of researchers has shown that the use of the mTOR inhibitor, everolimus, can delay tumour growth among both gastrointestinal and lung NETs. This is particularly important for patients with the lung tumours, the researchers say, because there is currently no approved treatment for such cases.

“Reporting on the results of the RADIANT-4 trial, a placebo-controlled, double-blind, phase III study carried out in centres in 13 European countries, Korea, Japan, Canada, and the US, Professor James Yao, MD, Chair of the Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, USA, will tell the 2015 European Cancer Congress today (Sunday) that the treatment had a significant effect in non-functional NETs. Non-functional NETs either do not secret a hormone, or secrete one that does not cause symptoms, and are therefore often diagnosed later when the cancer has become advanced. ‘About 80% of all NETs are thought to be non-functional, so, unfortunately, late diagnosis is common and poses a major problem for these patients,’ he will say.”


Everolimus Improves Progression-Free Survival for Patients with Advanced, Nonfuctional Neuroendocrine Tumors

“In an international Phase III randomized study, everolimus, an inhibitor of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), has shown to dramatically improve progression-free survival for patients with advanced, nonfunctional neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lung and gastrointestinal tract.

“James C. Yao, M.D., professor and chair, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center’s Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, presented the findings today in Vienna, Austria during the presidential session of the European Cancer Congress, co-sponsored by the European Cancer Organisation and European Society for Medical Oncology.

“NETs develop from cells in the neuroendocrine system, which is responsible for producing specific hormones that regulate the functions of different organs in the body. NETs can be slow-growing or aggressive, and are found most commonly in the lungs or gastrointestinal system. Nonfuctional NETs are those that do not secrete a hormone. About 80 percent of all NETs are nonfunctional, and therefore, patients often have few side effects and are diagnosed later, explains Yao.”