Newly-Approved Therapy Provides Improved Quality of Life for Midgut Neuroendocrine Tumor Patients

Excerpt:

“Midgut neuroendocrine tumors are a rare type of cancer that develops in the small intestine and colon. Roughly 12,000 people are diagnosed with this disease each year. In January, the United Stated Food and Drug Administration approved Lutathera, a first-of-its-kind peptide receptor radionuclide therapy. The injection consists of a somatostatin analog combined with a radioactive isotope that directly targets neuroendocrine tumor cells.

“Dr. Jonathan Strosberg, head of Neuroendocrine Tumor Program at Moffitt ‘Treatment options have been limited for  with neuroendocrine tumors and toxicities of treatment can often outweigh the benefit. Our studies have shown Lutathera is an effective option to treat tumor progression and also provide patients with a better  of life,’ said Jonathan R. Strosberg, M.D., head of the Neuroendocrine Tumor Program at Moffitt Cancer Center.”

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Six Tips to Spot Cancer ‘Fake News’

Excerpt:

Cancer is a popular topic for the media, as people care and worry about it in equal measure.

“News reports help people find out what researchers are working on, and how charitable donations are being spent. They also helps generate interest in the amazing science going on. But perhaps most of all, health stories and clinical trial results have a direct impact on people, raising interest in the latest discoveries further.

“And when it comes to , the emotion that’s tied to the subject means that scientific results must be discussed in a measured and accurate way. And most of the time that’s exactly what happens.”

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Strosberg Discusses Lutathera Approval, Remaining Challenges in NETs

Excerpt:

“Findings from the phase III NETTER-1 trial led to the January 2018 FDA approval of Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotatate) for the treatment of patients with somatostatin receptor–positive gastroenteropancreatic tumors (GEP-NETs). The trial compared Lutathera with high-dose octreotide LAR for patients with 1 or 2 metastatic midgut NETs.

“In NETTER-1, patients with midgut NETs who progressed on 30 mg of octreotide were randomized to Lutathera (n = 116) or high-dose octreotide (n = 113). Patients received 4 doses of Lutathera at 7.4 GBq every 8 weeks in combination with 30 mg of octreotide. The control arm received 60 mg of octreotide LAR every 4 weeks.”

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A New Regulatory Threat to Cancer Patients

Excerpt:

“The federal government is threatening to limit treatment options for doctors fighting cancer. A regulatory decision due Wednesday from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services could undermine the care delivered to the more than 1.6 million Americans who are diagnosed with cancer each year.”

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Cabozantinib Active in Carcinoid Tumors and Pancreatic NETs

Excerpt:

“Cabozantinib (Cabometyx) demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with carcinoid tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in a phase II trial.

“Patients with advanced carcinoid tumors (n = 41) or pancreatic NETs (n = 20) were enrolled in parallel cohorts. Both groups received 60 mg of oral cabozantinib daily and were restaged every 2 months for the first 6 months, and then every 3 months.”

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Kulke Sheds Light on Emerging Agents for Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“Several emerging agents are rapidly advancing the treatment paradigm for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

“Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotate) was approved by the FDA in January 2018 for patients with somatostatin receptor–positive gastroenteropancreatic NETs. The approval follows the findings of the phase III NETTER-1 trial, which demonstrated a 79% reduction in the risk of progression or death with Lutathera compared with octreotide LAR.”

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FDA Approves New Treatment for Certain Digestive Tract Cancers

Excerpt:

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotatate) for the treatment of a type of cancer that affects the pancreas or gastrointestinal tract called gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). This is the first time a radioactive drug, or radiopharmaceutical, has been approved for the treatment of GEP-NETs. Lutathera is indicated for adult patients with somatostatin receptor-positive GEP-NETs.”

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New Guidelines on Clinical Trial Design for Patients with Brain Metastases

Excerpt:

“Clinical trials of new anti-cancer therapies have often excluded patients whose disease has spread to the brain or central nervous system (CNS) or, if such patients were allowed on trial, trials have often failed to clearly capture information on the drug’s effect in the brain. Today new guidelines from an international, multidisciplinary group published in the journal Lancet Oncology describe how to most appropriately address cancer patients with CNS involvement within clinical trials of anti-cancer drugs.”

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Cancer Clinical Trials Exclude Many Desperate Patients. Should That Change?

Excerpt:

“When 29-year-old Carly Bastiansen was diagnosed in January 2016 with advanced pancreatic cancer, doctors told her a clinical trial was her best shot at slowing the notoriously quick-killing and hard-to-treat disease. She found one that appeared promising and went through the screening process. But the trial would not accept her.

“ ‘Participating in a clinical trial is really my only chance at living longer,’ Bastiansen, a children’s librarian in Baltimore, said this fall as she was growing weaker. ‘To have had that option taken off the table was devastating.’ ”

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