Cabozantinib Active in Carcinoid Tumors and Pancreatic NETs

Excerpt:

“Cabozantinib (Cabometyx) demonstrated promising clinical activity in patients with carcinoid tumors and pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) in a phase II trial.

“Patients with advanced carcinoid tumors (n = 41) or pancreatic NETs (n = 20) were enrolled in parallel cohorts. Both groups received 60 mg of oral cabozantinib daily and were restaged every 2 months for the first 6 months, and then every 3 months.”

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Kulke Sheds Light on Emerging Agents for Neuroendocrine Tumors

Excerpt:

“Several emerging agents are rapidly advancing the treatment paradigm for patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NETs).

“Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotate) was approved by the FDA in January 2018 for patients with somatostatin receptor–positive gastroenteropancreatic NETs. The approval follows the findings of the phase III NETTER-1 trial, which demonstrated a 79% reduction in the risk of progression or death with Lutathera compared with octreotide LAR.”

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FDA Approves New Treatment for Certain Digestive Tract Cancers

Excerpt:

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Lutathera (lutetium Lu 177 dotatate) for the treatment of a type of cancer that affects the pancreas or gastrointestinal tract called gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs). This is the first time a radioactive drug, or radiopharmaceutical, has been approved for the treatment of GEP-NETs. Lutathera is indicated for adult patients with somatostatin receptor-positive GEP-NETs.”

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New Guidelines on Clinical Trial Design for Patients with Brain Metastases

Excerpt:

“Clinical trials of new anti-cancer therapies have often excluded patients whose disease has spread to the brain or central nervous system (CNS) or, if such patients were allowed on trial, trials have often failed to clearly capture information on the drug’s effect in the brain. Today new guidelines from an international, multidisciplinary group published in the journal Lancet Oncology describe how to most appropriately address cancer patients with CNS involvement within clinical trials of anti-cancer drugs.”

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Cancer Clinical Trials Exclude Many Desperate Patients. Should That Change?

Excerpt:

“When 29-year-old Carly Bastiansen was diagnosed in January 2016 with advanced pancreatic cancer, doctors told her a clinical trial was her best shot at slowing the notoriously quick-killing and hard-to-treat disease. She found one that appeared promising and went through the screening process. But the trial would not accept her.

“ ‘Participating in a clinical trial is really my only chance at living longer,’ Bastiansen, a children’s librarian in Baltimore, said this fall as she was growing weaker. ‘To have had that option taken off the table was devastating.’ ”

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FDA Approves First-of-a-Kind Test for Cancer-Gene Profiling

Excerpt:

“U.S. regulators have approved a first-of-a-kind test that looks for mutations in hundreds of cancer genes at once, giving a more complete picture of what’s driving a patient’s tumor and aiding efforts to match treatments to those flaws.

“The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Foundation Medicine’s test for patients with advanced or widely spread cancers, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services proposed covering it.

“The dual decisions, announced late Thursday, will make tumor-gene profiling available to far more cancer patients than the few who get it now and will lead more insurers to cover it.”

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FDA Aims to Expand Early-Approval Program for Promising Drugs

Excerpt:

“The Food and Drug Administration wants to help patients get faster access to promising cancer treatments.

“The agency is preparing proposals that would expand an accelerated-approval program for lifesaving medications, FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb told House lawmakers on Thursday.

“Drugmakers can seek rapid conditional approval for treatments for cancer or other serious diseases based on evidence that a drug is likely to extend patient survival. Later trials once such a drug is on the market are necessary to prove the survival benefit.”

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Study Questions Exclusion of Cancer Survivors from Trials

Excerpt:

“A quarter of newly diagnosed cancer patients 65 or older are survivors who had a prior cancer — often preventing them from participating in clinical trials, researchers from UT Southwestern’s Simmons Cancer Center have found.

“The UT Southwestern scientists found that 11 percent of individuals ages 20-64 had a history of a prior cancer, and 25 percent of individuals 65 or older had a history of a prior cancer.

“As the number of cancer survivors grows, more individuals are being excluded from cancer clinical trials that could benefit them when diagnosed with a second cancer.”

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A Cancer Doctor Weighs In On CAR-T, Precision Medicine And Pricing Debates

Excerpt:

“Yesterday’s historic FDA approval of the first engineered T-cell treatment for cancer, Novartis’ Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel), was accompanied by inevitable questions about how the product would be priced. In the end, Novartis set the price at $475,000, which was lower than many analysts had predicted, considering the treatment is designed to cure some forms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL)—and in clinical trials it did just that for most patients.”

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